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Dark Jamaican Gingerbread

This cake, originally from the sugar-and-spice island of Jamaica, has sadly become a factory-made clone, but made at home it’s dark, sticky, fragrant with ginger – the real thing.

 Dark Jamaican Gingerbread


 175g plain flour, sifted
 1 level tablespoon ground ginger
 1 level dessertspoon ground cinnamon
 ¼ nutmeg, grated
 ½ level teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
 2 tablespoons milk
 75g black treacle
 75g golden syrup
 75g dark brown soft sugar
 75g block butter
 1 large egg, lightly beaten
 Pre-heat the oven to 170C, gas mark 3
Oven temperatures and Conversions
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Equipment:  A Silverwood loaf tin (or a standard 2lb loaf tin), lined with a 2lb traditional loaf tin liner

This recipe is from Delia's Cakes


Begin by placing the tin of black treacle (without a lid) in a saucepan of barely simmering water to warm it and make it easier to measure (see this recipe for weighing treacle).

Sift the flour and spices into a large bowl, then mix the bicarbonate of soda with the milk and set it on one side.

Now measure the black treacle, golden syrup, sugar and butter into a saucepan with 75ml of water, heat and gently stir until thoroughly melted and blended – don’t let it come anywhere near the boil and don’t go off and leave it!

Next add the syrup mixture to the flour and spices, beating vigorously with a wooden spoon, and when the mixture is smooth, beat in the egg a little at a time, followed by the bicarbonate of soda and milk.

Now pour the mixture into the prepared tin and bake on a lower shelf so that the top of the tin is aligned with the centre of the oven for 1¼–1½ hours until it’s well-risen and firm to the touch.

Remove the cake from the oven and allow to cool in the tin for 5 minutes before turning out.

If possible, store it in a cake tin, still in its lining, for 24 hours before eating, and serve it cut in thick slices spread with butter.


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