Lard

 Lard Key facts Lard was popular as a cheaper alternative to butter, especially during World War II, as well as being used for baking, until health concerns caused it to become less widely used. However, it has less saturated fat and cholesterol than butter! Lard is also used in soap making.

Lard is rendered pork fat, and was traditionally used both for frying and as a shortening – that is a fat used for pastry, biscuits and cakes.

After years of cooking and side-by-side tests and tastings my opinion is that, in most cases, the very best flavour and texture I've obtained with shortcrust pastry is when equal quantities of lard and butter are used

 
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