Mini excavator tree stumps

We know many of you are keen on gardening, so here's your latest plot: dug over, weed free and ready to sow the seeds of new ideas...

 
 
 

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

Day two...snowing :( but I am working in 90 minute bursts outside. Forget an 800kg digger - I ended up with the 1.5 tonne. You really do NOT want the 800kg. I've lifted out stumps that even after cutting into five pieces I cannot carry. It isn't hard to master as long as you have a nice big practice area. Don't try this in a small suburban garden without a bit of practice.

After around ten hours I am nearly half as fast as the builders I see, quite proud, to be honest but I don't suppose that I am exceptionally talented in that field so most of you will do the same or better.

The good thing is that as I dig I can see what I've got in the bucket and decide whether to set aside to rot, burn or skip.

The greatest physical effort so far is man-handling a 40kg bucket but could easily be done with the machine. I can carry 40kg so I did. No real need.

If you can drive a car and/or ride a horse you'll have no trouble. If it wasn't so blessed cold out there it would even be fun!

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queen jean

digger

wow bet you will be glad when its done.at least youve made a start .it will all be worth the effort but the weather dont help its been such a cold wind

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

QJ -- Yes, it's been bitter out there even with FOUR layers of clothing. Sir Ranulph Fiennes must either be a nitwit or lacking a gene!

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

I'm now getting to the stage where I would confidently remove an Easter egg from my 9 y/o granddaughter's head with the excavator. She's already eaten the egg, so I can't put it to the test :) Honestly, it is not so hard to do.

For anyone following this thread, I'd stress that 'driving' the machine is not the problem. You need firstly to know what you are trying to do...but more important, one hour's machine use needs at least two hours of manual work to pick up bits and so on. Ideally you'd have a machine, a 'driver' and two able-bodied people to help. In a typical family I'd make the driver the least able-bodied (though not feeble-minded). So the stereotypical 'she' will drive while 'he' labours by hand.

I let the 13 y/o grandson have a go and he was utterly hopeless. Totally unsafe. The 9 y/o granddaughter (sitting on my lap) was really good. Driving these machines is a gentle art.

One other comment, so far, is just how excellent these machines are for turning the soil. It only takes seconds to go down a metre and when you are practised you can turn the soil better and faster than any rotovator or plough. You could probably dig up the sewers, electric and gas with great speed, and I shall leave that to your imagination, and your commonsense.

I mentioned earlier that the 800kg machine would have been useless. I have the 1500 kg machine. 1500 kg is OK and powerful enough to bring up big tree roots. Next time I'd take the biggest machine I can get into my garden. If you need to excavate an alley or the foundations of a room, then you'll be constrained by dimensions. Otherwise big machines are easier and better than little machines and the rental cost difference is zilch (in my part of the world). Counter-intuitive but true.

I hope that this monologue will be of some help to someone here. If anyone would like to fire a question, please do so. In these days of austerity we all need to learn new skills to do it ourselves.

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queen jean

digger

by the sound of it you getting all under control though ,but reckon its hard going for you all.and its the cold weather too ,i feel for you all.but hopefully the end is in sight i hope ( is it ? )do hope you got plenty hot drinks to keep ya going .steering clear of mains etc must be a pain (no hidden treasure yet then )oh well soon be done i suspect and bet you will be glad too .good luck be carefull

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Queen of Puds

excavator skills

Glad you're using the right equipment for the job! OH would have tied a thick rope to the tow bar of the car & tried to heave them from the ground. He used that method for felling leylandii and silver birch when we moved in here - nearly took out the neighbours conservatory when one rope snapped! I can't decide if it is the tight Yorkshireman in him or just a macho need to beat convention by using alternative means of mechanical effort! Like scrap heap challenge here some days ....

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

QJ -- Yes, I pop in every 90 mins for a nice hot cuppa. Found a really ancient bottle yesterday. Circa 15th Century, I guess. I won't send it to the V&A just yet, tho'.

QOP -- I'm certain that your OH and I would get on famously. I only hired the digger after trying everything else. I even tried praying, but all that did was make it rain, so you have me to blame, maybe! Or the change of management?

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

My treasure! That old bottle. Eliman's Royal Embrocation for Horses. Bottle broken. 1899, probably. Unbroken bottle on Ebay £2.99 no bids ended. If anyone would like a seemingly valueless broken bottle.... ;) Would happily exchange for a fish supper. Or even a second-class stamp, he says hopefully. It's amazing just how valueless rubbish is.

How do car boot sales stay open?

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SonyaK

Mini excavator tree stumps

Well, some old 'rubbish' is useful to other people.
But an old broken bottle?? Unless you really love collecting broken glass:)

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

Sonya, I can't throw anything away. I recycle kitchen towels for cleaning and J Cloths go through a hierarchy from kitchen counter, bathroom, finally to clean the loo! After that I DO chuck them! It's amazing just how long glass lasts. Tens of thousands of years, I'd guess. Imagine our descendants stumbling across a land-fill and finding old Heinz ketchup bottles and puzzling over what they were used for. Horse embrocation is a little unusual.

Do you or does anyone else here remember Scott's Emulsion? I had that daily as a schoolboy.

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queen jean

digger

hi tomps have you done the work in garden now ? ive been away for a couple days with young one to the coast and it was freezing cold couldnt stand it .the dog loved it on the beach though ,back home now and got heating on and making small buns .anyway hope you are getting near end of the work and digging etc

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salls234

Attachments

Hey! I had to do a similar thing a few years back - hired a little digger, didn't have a clue what I was doing..

Anyways, I ended up using an attachment that's designed for digging up things that are solid in the ground. I can't think what it's called but I wouldn't have been able to do it without this!

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salls234

Attachements

http://www.robertleeplant.co.uk/article-skid-steer-attachments-infographic".UW_je47gLRY

3rd one down - post puller that's what you need!

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Tompeters

Mini excavator tree stumps

Thanks for that, though I am beyond that stage now...just removing final concrete/brick bits and grading the topsoil. It has been quite a trial! Utterly impossible without, unless you're a working navvy. Not sure they have navvies these days? Replaced by mechanical diggers?

 
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