Improve bread flour by adding gluten

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Biggles !

Bread and water

I know nothing about adding gluten, sorry; but I made bread this morning and have never added so much water. It's very cold here, nothing unusual about that, house is warm. I did put in an extra ounce of flour but exact quantities don't really matter either. I usually add just under a pint of tepid water to 2 pounds of flour. This morning I added 1 pint and a quarter. I use a KC with the dough hook; it took twice as long to get to the condition I look for. I go by the look of the dough too. It's proving very nicely and I'm quite confident I will get my usual 2 lovely loaves. Every time I make bread it is slightly different. Great fun though.

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Tompeters

Improve bread flour by adding gluten

That's interesting, Biggles. I used to mix by hand but since having the Panasonic, I use that. No real way to compensate. I put my flour into plastic food bags the minute I get it home and store in a large steel flour tin so the RH of the flour presumably doesn't change from what it was in the store. I got weevils on one occasion which is why I bag. I have a yen to make by hand again and one member here recently suggested that I make sourdough, which I shall.

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Nenna

flours

Tom, the best place to store your flours, especially wholemeal, is in the freezer. Obviously you must wrap the packets well, but you don't need to allow time for defrosting, just let it come to room temperature, and carry on . I always store my more unusual flours in the freezer, or if I see a bargain, it is worth buying in a good stock and storing it in the freezer. Obviously, you need the room in the freezer, always something to be aware of.

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Biggles !

Flour and freezer

Good point Nenna. I can buy a good all purpose flour at a very cheap price here, direct from the Mill which is only 20 minutes away. However, downside (perhaps) is the flour is not treated (possibly a GOOD thing) and I used to find things wriggling in the bag. I'm much sterner now. Buy good and cheap flour and keep in freezer so the eggs don't get a chance to hatch. They are not visible to the naked eye, therefore they will do me no harm (I think). I just hated it when I found things wriggling in the flour - had to throw the entire bag away. Just how I am.

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Tompeters

Improve bread flour by adding gluten

Thanks Nenna and Biggles. I don't really have room in my freezer, sadly. I've been OK since buying freezer bags and bagging/clipping immediately I get the flour home. I re-use the bags for months, until they fall apart, so the cost is trivial. Most of the flour I buy from supermarkets has a year sell-by on the label so I presume(?) that the supplier thinks it's bug-free? Years ago I did some consultancy work for a nuclear irradiation company and they used to irradiate many foods. Do they still do that?

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John S.

Butter and oil

Tom, I think you should spend a little of your time and worries researching the pros and cons re: butter and oils, why do you say butter is 80% fat and 20% H2o?, wrong!, what about solids?, where is their %age?
Not all oils are equal as you would know if you researched them, consider saturated vs. polyunsaturated fats, cholesterol content,etc.etc., you may be interested to know that lard has less than a third the amount of cholesterol than that of an equal sized portion of butter and also contains less saturated and trans fats than butter.
Do yourself a favour and research fats and oils and you will see the benefits of using lard, grapeseed, safflower, sunflower, canola and olive oils in your breadmaking instead of butter.

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Tompeters

Fat in butter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter

There is a tiny 1% protein in butter but it is essentially 80% fat 20% water. I think you're not in the UK - our brand leader baking fat is 'Trex' - essentially 100% vegetable fat and the Trex box says on it in red letters "If your recipe calls for butter or margarine you need 20% less Trex because it contains no water". So butter IS 20% water (approx, being a natural product it varies slightly but in the UK there is a legal minimum butter-fat content). If the leading brand of baking fat tells you to use 20% than butter that suggests it can be significant. Cooks are perfectly at liberty to ignore that, of course.

As for healthier fats, I'm sure you're right. However in a typical breadmaker mix there is 15g butter in a 700g loaf. So the amount of butter you'd get from a couple of slices is not great - 60g of fat per day is a sensible target for most as fat is essential in our diets. Most of us probably eat a lot more than that. I've quite often used peanut (groundnut) oil and of course olive oil gives an olive oil flavour which I'm not fond of in everyday sandwich/toast bread but delish in foccacia.

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Welshcookie

Butter

As you are so fond of quoting Wiki, what do you make of the assertion that vegetable shortening eg. Trex is 71 percent fat. Doesn't that throw all your pedantic calculations slightly off, or is Wiki incorrect? Or not referring to Trex?

Frankly the thought of Trex spread on toast revolts me so in preference I will stick to butter.

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Tompeters

Fats


" As you are so fond of quoting Wiki, what do you make of the assertion that vegetable shortening eg. Trex is 71 percent fat. Doesn't that throw all your pedantic calculations slightly off, or is Wiki incorrect? Or not referring to Trex?

Frankly the thought of Trex spread on toast revolts me so in preference I will stick to butter. "


Trex is stated by the manufacturers to be 100% fat. Where did the figure of 71% come from?

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Welshcookie

Butter

Wiki - butter - Nutritional Information - comparative properties - Vegetable shortening total fat 71g per 100g

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Tompeters

Fats


"Wiki - butter - Nutritional Information - comparative properties - Vegetable shortening total fat 71g per 100g "

I've no idea where they got that figure unless 'Trex' is not classed as a vegetable shortening. I have double-checked the box of Trex in my fridge and under Nutritional information is says Per 100g, Fat 100g. Have a look next time you're by the fats counter. You'll also see on the box (and on their website) their recommendation that you use 20% less than butter.

Maybe it's an American usage? I am pretty certain that marge in the UK is required by law to have the same minimum fat as butter which is 80% fat.

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Gravy Queen

David ??

James how do you know Tompeters name is David ?

 
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