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feathered

Strawberries

There are lots of wild strawberries in the garden already. I might plant some other varieties too. I love the idea of the children growing things -and they're very excited about that too. I'd like to do green beans. Carrots and parsnips would be wonderful. I'm slightly under the illusion that if we move in in November there'll be nothing to do until the Spring?
Toffee apples sounds like they would be very popular!

I'm very inspired to try different recipes . . . thank you everyone!

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Katrina B

Gluten and Dairy Free Diet

Hello Feathered, As someone who has had to go dairy free and with friends who are coeliacs, I have been able to adapt recipes to accommodate them. Use 'Pure' Soya Spread instead of butter in all baking cakes, etc., Stork block margarine for pastry with gluten free pastry (although it does not make the greatest of pastry) so make crumbles instead with added brown sugar and oats and reduce the flour. I have noticed that Jus-Rol do do a vegetable oil only ready made pastry so just read your labels. Don't forget to use gluten free baking powder with the plain flour (1 tsp per 125 gm of flour) for cakes and follow your favourite recipe with the 'all in one' method and you should have success. As it is so easy the 7 year old should be able to help you and have fun in the kitchen. If you all eat the food it will do you all no harm and will keep the intolerances at bay. Have fun and enjoy your cooking!

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Katrina B

Your Garden

As someone who is very envious of your new garden! with all your fruit trees get yourelf a good freezer and stand by next autumn for your gluts of fruit. Get them in the freezer and you will have a whole year's supply of fruit for your children. Get them to help you. Give them each a box (save all your ice cream boxes and margarine spread boxes) and watch them put in the stewed fruit and label them with their own name and they can get their own box out and eat the fruit in their own recipes. Making a crumble with their favourite toppings will help the fruit go down!

Growing veg with kids is fun. I do it with my grandchildren. In the spring buy a large plastic plant pot for each of them in their favourite colour. Let them choose (get the pots in a cheap shop not a garden centre they are hugely expensive!) and then let them chose some seeds. You will find that the children will want to grow flowers but that is OK. If you mix the vegetables (tomato, lettuce, radish, cress, and annual herbs like basil and coriander with marigolds and nasturtiums which will bring in the insects and the children can "spot the bug!!" Let us know how your garden grows!!

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feathered

Gardening with children

I actually feel like I could squeak with excitement about it. We won't move until November so I'm still a bit worried that it will all fall through. I currently have a tiny city courtyard. I have some large planters - mostly planted with acer trees, clematis and a variety of underplanting - geraniums, astrantia and ferns. I have a few smaller pots with scented pelargoniums. I have a single strawberry plant - no other fruit or vegetables.

The plant pot idea is lovely. I think they'll love doing that. Nasturiums have huge seeds too, don't they. Perfect for little hands.

Any gardening book recommendations - particularly dealing with when and how to prune?

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Yummy

Gardening for Children

I bought my grand-daughter two Dorling Kindersley children's gardening books from Aldi and they were just £2.99 each, along with a couple of packets of seeds to grow she loved her birthday present.
There is one now available from The Book People called "Grow it Eat it" but is a little more expensive at £4.99 the isbn number for it is ISBN: 9781405328104 .
The second book was crafty things to do in the garden. If you look on Amazon you will find lots.
Good Luck, and have fun .

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feathered

Gardening books

Thanks yummy.
I think I have the garden crafts one you mentioned already. I'll have a look at the other one x

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Noreen, Board Moderator

Fussy twins

Welcome to Delia Online Feathered! What a nightmare for you... Have you tried cooking the same for everyone and ignoring their reaction? If they absolutely refused to eat what was given to them and then it was taken away when everyone was finished, with no fuss or mention, but they had no pudding, would that have any effect?

I think making different meals for everyone is a total drag and seems really unfair on you. Perhaps they just need the whole thing playing down?

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Welshcookie

Fussy twins

Absolutely agree Noreen.

Food is one of the few ways children can exert power over adults.

It is not a good idea to pander to their every whim. How do they manage at school?

Do not make a fuss about anything they won't eat. Make no comment. Do not try to tempt them to eat. Never offer rewards if they eat any specific food. Just take anything uneaten away when the adults finish eating.

No child will starve themselves and any food group you perceive is missed from their diet will be made up elsewhere. Do not allow them to fill up with fizzy drinks before meals. Avoid snacks. Do not allow food between meals.

Let the children choose the menu,quite often, especially on their birthdays and at weekends. Let them help with the preparation of food.

Never overface children. Let them ask for seconds if they want more.

Make sure the adults eat a wide range of food and never express a distaste for any food. Mealtimes are for enjoyment, not battles.

Good luck. It will be fine.

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violet eyes

feeding the children

Wise words Welshcookie.

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Pan-tastic

Feeding juniors

Like Honey I was a very fussy eater as a child but I seem to have grown out of it! I have a six year old who has a natural default button for saying 'I don't like that'. But he is definitely getting better. Sometimes I do blatantly bribe him to try something for the first time but once he has tried it, he very often does like it so it can go on the menu. He is getting much better at green stuff! I often batch cook salmon fishcakes and add frozen peas and then he used to help me dig them in the egg and then the crumbs and grated cheese to make a nice crunchy coating - if they've helped make it, they are much more inclined to eat. If a bit of ketchup or mayo helps it go down, that's fine- don't let them have too much or to get into the habit of having it with everything. Easy to make a tomato sauce for pasta etc by sauting carrot, celery, onion, red pepper, adding passata and tom puree and then cooking it down before pureeing and thus adding sneaky veg. And obviously no pudding or treats unless a decent proportion if not all the main meal is eaten.

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Katrina B

Gardening Books

Hello feathered. Books, I could give you a huge list of books to help you. The best thing I can suggest is that you get the Gardeners World Magazine. It is a monthly mag with blow by blow instructions of what to do that month! All advice is from our garden heroes. Alan Tichmarsh, Monty Don and Carol Klein to name but a few. The magazine also advises on books to get for those who want to get more advice. Buy a copy this month and have a look and see what you think.

I hope all goes well with your house and things move on quickly. Just think what fun you will have when you move in going out and getting holly and ivy to deck your halls ready for Xmas!

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feathered

Children eating

Thanks again. I am aiming for small steps - rather than overdoing it and scaring them off. My main strategy (having read all the advice on here) is to try not to react to the fussiness. I have to say that they are all happy and healthy children - so that's good starting point.

Also grateful for the "Gardeners World" magazine tip. I'll buy a copy today!

x

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Queen of Puds

Fussy eaters

Many of us have been there - my daughter would never eat gravy, & it took years to get her to try something new. She lived on chicken nuggets & chips & yet my son was all about mash & gravy! She is now 19 & will eat almost anything & only yesterday my 16 yr old son asked if he could try ratatouille (err, YES) - whereupon he pronounced it 'ok actually' - so they will change. I just decided it wasn't worth the fight & cooked what I could when we all ate together & let them have their choices when it was simpler. They would also eat crudites if I did a buffet style lunch with baby bel, cold cocktail sausages, pitta or rolls & cress/salad. They hated tomatoes until teens however - but don't forget.veg in puds - there is a recipe for chocolate muffins using grated courgettes that is brilliant - low fat & quite healthy & if you could get them to eat a choc cream cheese frosting with them that might add more dairy?! I will type that up later & put it in my profile ....
Good luck with them though - you may also find that the little devils eat more widely once they go to friends houses for tea - my brother in laws kids ate all manner of things un-pressed when they stayed over with us - parents astounded!

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feathered

for Queen of Puds

Thank you -
That's so reassuring. I'm sure they'll be fine. I'd love to try the chocolate muffin recipe with courgette. Sounds perfect. x

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Yummy

Muffins

there is a recipe on my profile for Chocolate Beetroot muffins if you want to have a look, they are delicious, and the kids would never know they were eating beetroot, they are so moist, and with a frosting top they would go down a treat !

 
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