Life's too short....

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Rob C

thanks Jampling...

good to be back.

The other thing I cant master is crumble topping. So, I have decided that lifes too short to faff about trying to make it...so I buy it ready mixed (its what I call the "How to Cheat" philosophy). The crumble mix I make ends up too floury, too buttery or too sweet.
If anyone has an easy formula for a crumble topping for two then I may be convinced!!

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Thistledo

Life's too short ... crumble topping

6 oz plain flour, 3-4 oz butter. Rub together but not as fine as breadcrumbs, rather a more rustic look. Sprinkle over the innards and then sprinkle a small amount of demerara sugar over the top, to make it nice and crunchy. You could also put tiny dollops of butter over the top for extra yummyness. No need to put sugar in the mix as there's probably plenty in the fruit.

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Honey

Crumble

I love this method that Saffy told us about...

Crumbly Crumble

Melting the butter makes the crumble nice and crumbly. Quantities need to be adjusted according to size of dish and people you’re serving.

Ingredients:

6oz plain flour.
3oz melted butter.
2 - 3oz caster sugar.

Add a pinch of mixed spice or cinnamon to the mixture if you like it, or add it to the fruit.

Prepare fruit according to type (or cheat and open a tin).

Sift flour into a bowl.

Add sugar and pour in melted butter.

Toss together until mixed (I use a fork to break it up into small ‘balls’ rather than crumbs).

Cook in the usual way until golden.

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Rob C

I might be persuaded...

...after reading those two methods. The trouble I have is I always seem to add too much flour!

I especially like the sound of the melted butter!!

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Tompeters

Life's too short.....

T'do, yes that's what I do but my problem is I always add too much cream (Elmlea) at the table! As for irons, aren't they sticks that golfers use to hit the little white ball?

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Rob C

Irons


"As for irons, aren't they sticks that golfers use to hit the little white ball?"

Nooooo, you've got it all wrong...irons are what the underclasses are locked into when they dont pay their taxes ;-)

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Tompeters

Life's too short....


"
"As for irons, aren't they sticks that golfers use to hit the little white ball?"

Nooooo, you've got it all wrong...irons are what the underclasses are locked into when they dont pay their taxes ;-)"


And ex-cabinet ministers who tell porkies?

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Welshcookie

Cream

Repeat after me, as many times as it takes to get it right.

Elmlea is not cream. Cream is a pure, unadulterated, wholesome product. Elmlea is not.

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Biggles !

Life's too short, but laughter makes it longer....

Brilliant thread.

Violet Eyes, I so miss life in the Colchester area; I miss you (my twin parted at birth I think, but you could have taught me a LOT (I'm here to learn xx)).

Rob, Saff's method is foolproof and so very easy; been making it for years now (OK, only make a couple of crumbles a year these days). Hubby loves it, nice and crunchy topping. I double the quantities because everybody appears to like crunchy, yummy, crumble.

Jampling, I'm off to 'Google' your method. I so like long, slow cooked sauces. I adore Delia's Ragu too xx

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Tompeters

Life's too short...


" Repeat after me, as many times as it takes to get it right.

Elmlea is not cream. Cream is a pure, unadulterated, wholesome product. Elmlea is not. "


Elmlea is made by the same firm that makes Marmite. Sure, it is made from a number of ingredients but I can't see why a mix of ingredients is a problem? It's a blend of buttermilk and vegetable oils, according to the manufacturer. Is that any less wholesome than, say leek and potato soup with seasoning? The fat, calorie content and saturated fat contact is far lower than cream, so if anything it's more wholesome, I would have thought. And it has a terrific shelf life.

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Biggles !

Shelf life is FAR too long, imvho .....



" Repeat after me, as many times as it takes to get it right.

Elmlea is not cream. Cream is a pure, unadulterated, wholesome product. Elmlea is not. "

YESssssss.

From Tompeters "And it has a terrific shelf life."
I do so hope this is written 'tongue in cheek' but I suspect not. I cannot abide squidgy spray 'cream'. Just expressing a personal opinion from one who really misses great British cream. I'd rather do without than muck about with aerated crud. Hmmmmm, no. I do not and never have liked Elmlea, sorry xxx

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maggie-

Crumble....

I made saffy's crumble tonight, I read it, it sounded easy and it was...even for me.With a tin of rhubarb that had been lurking in the cupboard.My boyfriend was delighted, pudding on a Monday? We made the fruit scones yesterday, bigg success! Blimey...at this rate we'll be 2 stones heavier by July! eek! Tasty salads for 3 days!!x

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Tompeters

Life's too short...

" I cannot abide squidgy spray 'cream'. Just expressing a personal opinion from one who really misses great British cream. I'd rather do without than muck about with aerated crud. Hmmmmm, no. I do not and never have liked Elmlea, sorry xxx
"

You must be thinking of a different product. Elmlea is not squirty cream, which I also detest and refuse even when there is no alternative. Elmlea comes in a pot much like fresh cream. It is mostly butterfat but has some veg fat. It used to contain hydrogenated veg fat but of course it does no longer. The mouth feel, smell and taste is very comparable to cream. It is inferior, I grant you, but it is quite similar, has less fat, less sat fat and fewer calories. The shelf life is as long as UHT but without that revolting UHT tang.

If you are missing British cream, have you tried Italian marscapone which is available in most countries? It is very close to extra-thick fresh cream; slightly different but not 'inferior' and goes with everything double cream goes with.

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Tompeters

Biggles, cream in France

Just noticed you're in France. Of course most cream in France in the shops is soured, squirty or UHT but if you are close to a rural area you should be able to find plain cream in the farmers market. If it's not on display, I'm sure they'll make some for you to collection the next week as the process is the same to start with. France though is not generally good for dairy. Very high bacteria counts as a legal maximum compared with Spain, Austria, Switzerland and Germany.

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JAMES

Life's too short.


" For making your own Pizzas and Bolognaise Sauce. "

But all shop made sauce is dreadful!!!!!!!

 
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