Teaching kids to cook

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Yummy

Teaching Kids to Cook

sorry, didn't mean it all to be highlighted just the bits in inverted commas.

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Alan

Fair point

Thanks Jampling and Yummy for your kind words! I do enjoy the work, being paid to cook is a pleasure, however you do it in my opinion!

You do make a fair point Yummy about it being only the parents who have an interest in cooking who will take these courses. While we were implementing the programme the more cynical members on the council suggested, with some justification from previous experience, that as the courses would be in the most deprived areas, some learners would come simply for the free creche facilities. And to be honest, on some courses I have either got the impression some learners were there just for that reason, some even openly admitting it. And yet as the courses have progressed, it's often been these very people who have soon started to take an interest in the cooking, and become enthusiastic and valuable members of the group.

Of course, those already with a keen interest in cooking healthily are very welcome on the course, but it is these (dysfunctional?!) learners who are helping to make the programme a success. The only drawback is that I'm the only qualified trainer for the whole borough, so it keeps me very busy, but I shouldn't complain about that!

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Tompeters

Teaching kids to cook

Alan, it's very interesting to have your input on this as one who is actually doing the job. Imagine, for a moment, that you didn't need or particularly want the job, what would you recommend to your employers that they should do next, when you have left?

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Alan

Where to next?

The short answer I'd give to your question would be they should continue the courses. More specifically, I think all schools should be encouraged to offer the courses, and that intermediate (perhaps even advanced) courses should in time be offered to students who have done the current courses. I have already suggested this to the council as a way forward, once the present courses are more established.

An example of the content of future more advanced courses would be subjects like sustainability (the council's current buzz word!), e.g. using seasonal produce, perhaps even growing their own produce. And although we of course cover basic food hygiene, I have also suggested we run more advanced, accredited courses in this subject, giving learners another benefit, as this would make them more employable if they wanted to seek work in the food industry, building on the knowledge and interest gained by the healthy eating course.

These are just some ideas of how I would suggest the programme is developed if I left.

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Tompeters

Teaching kids to cook

We think alike. I'd add to that the full First Aid cert as a mandatory curriculum item.

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Gravy Queen

Teaching kids to cook

It's an interesting subject, not entirely sure of the perfect answer but in general I think cookery at school should be taught, combined perhaps with healthy eating education, given that obesity is such a problem . Saying that I was taught to cook at school and wasn't the slightest bit interested and can barely remember anything ( that's my age um ) .

I only took a real interest when I had my own family and then I turned to Delia who really did teach me how to cook !

Not everyone wants to cook so not all parents can teach . I grew up with a Dad who was more interested in cooking and Mum did the bits she liked . I was never specifically taught anything but again, later in life, I became interested and asked for recipes.

A lot of it is common sense which sadly some people are lacking .....

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Foodie.herts

Children are taught to cook

I am a newbie but registered to reply to this subject.
I am wondering if any of you actually have children at secondary school? If so you will know it is compulsory to teach food technology at KS3. I know because I teach it.

Students are taught on a rotation with other technology subjects ( graphics, resistant materials etc ) and can then opt opt take it at GCSE in Y10 , KS4.

What it does not allow for is this : children who cannot identify vegetables, cannot peel vegetables, cannot wash up ( don't have a clue).
Students who week after week do not bring their ingredientsinto school because they forgot, or parents don't buy them or parents won't buy them. Parents sending in notes asking me to buy them !
It does not account for students who finish a dish then put it in the bin because 'we don't eat that stuff at home ' Namely pasta, rice, healthy options.
It starts at home. Full stop. Schools cannot make parents spend their money on fruit and veg, nor stop them from speding it on takeaways or chips. Nor stop them from prioritising their income on cigarettes rather than indredients for pasta bake.
So before you slate the schools, look behind front doors first.

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Tompeters

Teaching kids to cook

Great to have your professional input, Foodie herbs and a warm welcome to DOL! My kids are past school age but they (two girls) didn't learn anything useful in school about cookery - their 'fault', us or the school/teachers I know not. My stepdaughter went to a very posh private school in Godalming (1980s) and was told to bring a pack of Smash, a tin of Tyne Brand S&K and, if I remember right, some Surprise dried peas!!

I'd love to know how to engage with children to teach cookery as our grandchildren often stay. My mum and gran engaged by NOT talking about cookery...talked about everything else but cooking while doing the cooking and passing the task over from time to time. My grandchildren, frankly, are not interested :(( But that might be my fault as they are neither stupid nor lazy.

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Gravy Queen

Teaching kids to cook

My son is is sixth form now but he didnt have food technology.

I do teach him to cook at home and he is keen, often cooking for himself.

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Darkginger

Teaching kids to cook

Thinking back, when I was at school in the 60s/70s, we had domestic science lessons, but all I remember being taught to cook was rock cakes! My Mum (bless her) hated cooking, so I didn't learn much at home, either. My first exposure to 'interesting' food (before this it had been all meat and 2 veg) was when Vesta brought out their range of dried meals in the 70s. That was what prompted me to find out how to cook. Also Mum used to get those Colman's packs of powder that apparently made 'Coq au Vin' and 'Chicken Chasseur'. I was convinced that there was a better way to make those dishes, so I used to get recipe books out of the library and read them - not use them, just read them!

It wasn't until I became a student in the early 80s, and had the facilities and the need to cook for myself that I really got into it (that and a holiday at a friend's Dad's place - he grew his own veg and was very into cooking). I think anyone with an interest in food will eventually learn to cook for themselves, but there are people (believe it or not!) who just aren't interested, see food as fuel more than a pleasure, and no amount of education will get them cooking.

I have never made another rock cake, btw :D

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Esther R

Teaching kids to cook

I am inclined to agree with Violet Eyes that domestic science lessons will never again be the same as they were in our day because the world has moved on so much.

My father was most definitely a dysfunctional parent and we would not have been allowed anywhere near the kitchen. My mum was hard put to find the money for the ingredients and there was sometimes trouble from my father about the things I had to take to school.

I loved domestic science lessons, I loved the sense of order and I loved the feeling of success I felt when everything turned out ok.

Over the years I have been so grateful for those lessons. Although the world is so different now, I am sure children today benefit from these classes even though sometimes there are difficulties from the parents.




 
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