Food safety/poisoning

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Biggles !

safety with food

Oh yes, I must admit my fridge really needs a good clean. Everything is safe, lids on etc so no danger of cross contamination between foodstuffs ..... I'm just not prepared to clean the shelves every day. Something always gets messy.

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Tompeters

Food safety/poisoning

"I detest watching some people cooking on the TV, such as Master Chef with their sweat pouring down into the food."

I agree. Other pet hates are nose-blowing then not washing hands, animals in the kitchen, cookware not properly cleaned.. I'm told that any trained professional chef or cook regards a total clean-up of the kitchen and utensils as part of the job before going home. Otherwise it gets smelly, let alone dangerous. I like restaurants that have a hatch or window onto the kitchen so you can see the cooks at work. Shows complete self-confidence. Not necessary at the very finest Michelin restaurants, I suppose.

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Rob C

oh lordy...

...you put me all to shame.

The kitchen is clean, tidy and well looked after. I always wash my hands before and after preparing any type of food. I always use anti-bac on the surfaces I prepare food on.

however, and this is where I hang my head in shame - I dont change the tea towel daily, I dont use different coloured chopping boards, the fridge is always in need of a tidy up - although it is clean...and I dread the thought of cleaning the oven out.

Still, I never fall ill with anything food related - not that I know of anyway.

Good luck...maybe, or is what I do enough?

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Darkginger

Food safety/poisoning

You're all a lot better than me! I admit my kitchen cleanliness leaves a lot to be desired, but then again I've not once had any issues with food poisoning in many years of cooking in a somewhat sub-standard kitchen!

If I'm cooking for anyone other than my husband and myself, I up my game and make sure everything is perfectly hygenic - but most of the time we just bumble along, being 'clean enough' but without worrying too much about it.

The exception to my less than rigorous attention to hygiene is chicken - I always wash knives and chopping boards immediately after using them for chicken. Also wine making - it's a waste of time if I don't sterilise everything first.

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Welshcookie

Food preparation

The very best barrier to cross-contamination is not gloves because they are not discarded often enough, but skin. That is bare hands, so long as there are no cuts or broken skin.

People are much more likely to wash their hands between tasks if they are not wearing gloves.

Anybody seen shop assistants taking money while wearing the same pair of gloves they used to serve food, because the employer told them not to use so many pairs of gloves?!

Yes, I know it is wrong, but it happens.

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Tompeters

Food safety/poisoning

Not surprisingly a vast amount of work has been done measuring the germ reduction for different hand washing techniques, soaps, water, germicides, and even the effect of air vs paper towel drying: surprisingly, different pathogens are best reduced by different methods. Anyway, for the home environment the US CDC say:

HOW TO WASH YOUR HANDS

Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.

Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.

Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the "Happy Birthday" song from beginning to end twice.

Rinse your hands well under running water.

Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

-------------------------------

One medical abstract I read showed experimental data that air drying by machine is far less effective at reducing contamination than paper towels and that the air dryers can actually spread contamination around the washroom.

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jampling

Food safety


" The very best barrier to cross-contamination is not gloves because they are not discarded often enough, but skin. "

I would hazard a guess that any research pertains to commercial operations, where I can certainly believe that gloves may not be changed often enough.

However, I use my gloves in a home kitchen and only for raw poultry. I use the gloves while I prepare the poultry on my raw meat board and place in its cooking utensil. I then immediately toss the gloves. (Followed, I might add, by disinfecting anything I might have accidentally touched with the gloves).

I can't believe that such use can be in any way considered unsafe. And it saves me the revulsion of having raw poultry touching my bare skin. They are particularly handy, I might add, when flouring/egging and breading poultry. Such a yucky task with bare hands!




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Welshcookie

Gloves

I do use them when cutting up chillies.

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SonyaK

Food safety/poisoning

I consider my kitchen to be clean and tidy, but I don't use antibacterial stuff on bench tops, although I do wipe them regularly. Don't change tea-towels so often - but don't use them much, anyway.
Not eating meat makes things easier, I think. Have plastic chopping boards for onion/garlic and other vegs but wooden or bamboo boards for bread and fruit.
Never boil anything - use sponges for washing up and change them when they get worn. Then use them for sink cleaning until they disintegrate.
The fridge is kept clean and the oven doesn't get very dirty - no roasts to spit fat everywhere!!
Haven't poisoned anyone yet, so I'm not about to change things!

One friend in UK used to have the Kitty Litter in the kitchen!! I remember trying to eat lunch with a foul smell just deposited in the tray - I was almost gagging.
Now that is disgusting, I think!!

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Tompeters

Food safety/poisoning

Sonya, I'm sure you're right that being vegetarian is a different ball game. Leaving aside the fact that meat and their splashes is a great culture for bacteria, veg doesn't bring many nasties with it into the kitchen. Off the top of my head I can't think of a dangerous veg pathogen unless you include the toxin in some pulses, but not the same, really.

Does anyone know of a danger in veg?

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jampling

Food safety poisoning

You're asking about veggies that can cause food poisoning?

What, apart from all the deadly cases of salmonella in fresh spinach and in packaged salads? There have been many deaths in North America attributed to this particular veggie nasty.

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Yummy

Food Safety

Yes, wasn't there a big hoo haa over Bean sprouts from Germany causing Salmonella not too long ago ?

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Tompeters

Food safety/poisoning

Yes, I'd forgotten about those cases. I imagine the salmonella came from animal origins, perhaps soil, fertiliser or the water supply?

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Gerry

bacteria

" I don't use antibacterial stuff on bench tops,"
Use of these products increases bacterial resistance to them.

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SonyaK

Food safety/poisoning

"Use of these products increases bacterial resistance to them."

Good point, Gerry. I won't feel guilty then!!
I think some people are a bit over the top with the bleach and the boiling, but each to their own:)

 
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