Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

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JAMES

Horse Meat in burgers.

Bigs, no good for tomorrow, but do remember I would always post you a couple of bits that you needed if you tell me exactly what I'm getting.

Not a problem in the slightest.

x

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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

James, you'd be surprised. Yes, there are some really attractive deals on offer at Mcdonalds and almost freebies for kiddies but have a look at their menu online and look at what you pay for what is essentially a burger and fries. Not that I'm moaning...the environment is always clean and fresh, 8 times out of 10 I'd give it 8 out of 10 for what it is. But cheap, it ain't when you consider the cost of the basic food. Commonsense supports that, doesn't it? Unless McD is being supported by the NHS or something? LOL!

Luncheon at the Waterside Inn is around £50. McD is around £5 (usually ++). At the Waterside Inn you get a three course meal with true silver service, at least two waiters in attendance at all times. It's my fave place. What's yours?

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JAMES

Horse Meat in burgers.

You cannot compare the cost of the raw ingredients to the sale price when eating out. I know McDonalds is not exactly eating out but they provide very cheap food. I've certainly never paid £5 + for a meal in there, but then I have a small appetite.

Big mac, fries, drink, less than £5 is NOT expensive! Its dirt cheap.

As for my favourite place, I'm easily pleased in reality, my local chinese is superb, local indian is wonderful and make my curry without onion in for me as I can't eat it and I also love "Jamie's Italian".

Yummy!

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maggie-

Supermarkets are at fault..

May I say I would not choose to eat horse meat others may.

No one is keener to obscure what we are eating than the supermarkets.This is spurred I think by a hunger for cheap and varied food....its dangerous territory. Regulation is barely there.

Edible food that looks wrong is discarded or rejected.I read that we throw away between 30-50% of the food we buy from supermarkets and 75% of the veg we grow in britain is never eaten!one million kids in this country live in poverty.

If you do not know what food is supposed to taste like how can you tell what you are eating?

I suppose...you can't!

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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

I totally agree, Maggie. And it is the supermarkets who refuse to pass out the perfectly good end-of-life produce to locals in need. They actually taint it with colouring to make it unfit for human consumption.

It's not that they are being deliberately nasty, it's that if you pass out free of charge food you distort the market. It really is against their financial interests to let the food go free or cheap.

The same happens with charity shops. Low rents, minimal council tax and volunteer labour coupled with donation of nearly-new products are putting regular retailers out of business. They simply cannot compete.

It's a real problem. On the one hand we need to encourage the full use of edible food and re-usable product yet on the other hand we cannot torpedo the livelihoods of everyone working in the 'normal' economy. I don't know the solution but I have to agree that throwing good food out is a scandal.

Can we all please boycott BOGOFs, please? I boycott 95% of them on principle and only buy them when I really expect to be able to use them up. Then again, a melon at £2 and two for £3 is a temptation :(

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JAMES

Horse Meat in burgers.

I've never understood the "ugly veg" thing that supermarkets have, carrots all look the same when I've peeled, chopped and popped them into my steamer!


However, I do like BOGOF's. I don't buy things we won't eat, so I don't really see the issue, and I detest throwing food away and it rarely happens here. An BOGOF offer certainly does not sway me to buy something I don't actually want, although I do know people who fall for it. (oooh, now you've got two lots of a product that you did not even want one of! Aren't you clever!)

I don't really have a problem with the major supermarkets although I shop at a minor when when possible (Waitrose) Nothing wrong with a company employing lots of people, making money and being successful.

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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

James -- The problem with BOGOFs is that they seem inherently unfair and indefensible. Consider the typical BOGOF of £2 per melon or 2 for £3 (OK, so not exactly BOGOF but let that pass). A large Honeydew melon will serve a desert for two people for two meals. So to benefit from the price reduction you have to have melon Mon, Tues, Wed and Thursday. What about people alone? What about people for whom melon is a treat? What possible justification can there be for the price reduction? To my mind it is hugely discriminatory against those who can least afford to pay. Now is you are talking about a big pack of something where packaging can be saved, maybe....but even then I question whether the cost savings are proportionate to the price reduction.

Especially in these difficult economic times we need to spare more thought for those who are not as well off as some of us.

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JAMES

Horse Meat in burgers.

I do have to disagree with a lot of that, sorry!

Your rarely get such offers on fresh fruit and veg, at least you don't where I shop, its normally 1/2 price instead in Sainsburys and Waitrose.

Most BOGOF's are on store cupboard ingredients, packs of pasta etc, which anyone can store still needed.

I'm sure very many people find them very useful!

I do agree that whilst I am by no means rich these days, I'm not worrying about tomorrow nights supper....


(Oh, and a whole melon will last WEEKS in the fridge!!!!!! )

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Welshcookie

BOGOF

What about people alone? What about people for whom melon is a treat? What possible justification can there be for the price reduction? To my mind it is hugely discriminatory

What you have written just does not make sense! No one is obliged to buy one and take one free. Just take the one. Or don't buy the product at all.

But it would be stupid to leave the free one behind, it is free!

Why not give the extra one to your neighbour, friend or acquaintance.

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maggie-

Decent behaviour

I am also in a fortunate position, I choose where I shop. I commend Waitrose on its product info, I like to know where my food has travelled from. I've never really been an advocate of organic, I'm too well aware that folk need to buy a £2.00 chicken to feed a family,but I do like to buy local or British.

Just saying...supermarkets enjoy Massive Economies of Scale and huge profits. Is it too much to ask that they provide decent and safe ingredients(moral behaviour) in there value ranges?!

Night folks!

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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

OK, well we have different experience. Where I am the melon story has been like that for several months both at the Coop and Morrisons. £2 each and two for £3 i.e. £3 each. I take your point about keeping honeydews which are not my faves anyway but loads of people just don't want two honeydews! So why are they priced at £2 each for singles and £1.50 each for two? How much for three? £5, I suppose? It is wrong, it encourages waste and prevents singles and poorer households from buying the product.

Can you give me one good reason they don't charge £1.50 each? This has been happening for months in my district and I'd guess that if it isn't the same in your district you'll find similar truly unfair pricing deals.

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JAMES

Horse Meat in burgers.

Why are special offers wrong? They are not. There is no reason why an item should not be £2 for 1 or £3 for two! Its a very standard, aged old retail practice.

It does not encourage waste, it encourages decent planning. I do not throw food away. USE the special offer by making a melon sorbet or something instead of blaming the "system" for people having to throw food away, instead of taking the responsibility yourself! Long live BOGOF!


But then I'd not shop in Morrisons if they were paying me three quid for the two melons let alone the other way around!!!!!! (I don't know of a local co-op, there was one where I used to live but again I'd not give it shopping time....)


Oh, and I've been single for nearly three years and can still make perfect use of BOGOF offers. I don't buy the ones that I won't use, does that mean it should be stopped for the family that might live next door who CAN get through that product. No. We live in a free market, buy what you want, don't buy what you don't and if not enough people buy things, stores will stop it!

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Welshcookie

Pricing

What is your reasoning, Tompeters? One minute you say 2 melons are to much, then you are speculating as to the price of 3.

In my Tesco one day there was an offer of Buy One Pizza, Get Two Free. Did I buy? Like Heck I didn't. But the offer might have been a good deal for someone.

Your melon example does not take into account a sudden glut of melons. Would you prefer it if they were sent to landfill before they reached the shops?

Producers have to grow 140 percent of what they need to supply the retailer in case something goes awry. Because retailers are so draconian if the orders are not filled that is 40 percent built in waste, before the crops leave the field.


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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

Hi WC,
"What is your reasoning, Tompeters? One minute you say 2 melons are to much, then you are speculating as to the price of 3."

No, if you re-read what I posted I said that Morrisons are selling one melon for £2 or two melons for £3. So if you buy two melons, you will be charged £3 i.e. £1.50 each. Given that official statistics show how much food goes to waste, and the economic situation leaving people really struggling, how is it in the national interest to force people who only want or need one melon to pay £0.50 more for it, than it would have cost had they bought two?

"In my Tesco one day there was an offer of Buy One Pizza, Get Two Free. Did I buy? Like Heck I didn't. But the offer might have been a good deal for someone."

So are you suggesting that Mr Tesco is being altruistic? If he wanted to be altruistic wouldn't he offer to cut the pizzas in half for those who couldn't afford or use a whole one? As grocers did in years gone by.

"Your melon example does not take into account a sudden glut of melons. Would you prefer it if they were sent to landfill before they reached the shops?"

Better that than be taken home to be collected by the bin-man! i.e. tow trips to the same landfill. But better still for them to go to food manufacturers for processing, or the restaurant trade, maybe?

"Producers have to grow 140 percent of what they need to supply the retailer in case something goes awry. Because retailers are so draconian if the orders are not filled that is 40 percent built in waste, before the crops leave the field."


That's possibly true, I don't have the figures but I'll take your word for it. A recent poll found that the vast majority of people really hate BOGOFs and their little brothers, Buy One Get Second Half Price.

Sure, we all try to work round it and those of us who can manage the finances and home-processing don't do too badly but maybe we should spare a thought for those less fortunate.

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Tompeters

Fraudulent Ingredients (horsemeat)

WC -- Sorry that a whole lot of my post is emphasised in bold pink. I can't edit it but I had only intended to quote your specific points, not my reply! My apologies if you thought I was 'shouting', it wasn't intended :)

 
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