Condensed milk

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Tompeters

Condensed milk


"
If you pressure cook the temp will rise above 100C internally and if you let the pressure out of the cooker before the tin is less than 100C, the contents will boil unless the pressure rises to around 15 psi (that is a LOT and is likely to burst any tin, ringpull or ordinary).

I don't understand this post"


If you pressure-cook at 15 psi the temperature is 121C. Boiling point of water is no pressure (I mean atmospheric, which also happens to be 15 psi by coincidence) is 100C. So if you 'beamed-out' a la Star Trek the can at 121C the can would have to maintain the external pressure of 15 psi because below 15 psi the water in the liquid will be boiling i.e. producing steam like inside a steam-engine boiler. Inside the pressure cooker, the pressure cooker holds that pressure, of course. No can can withstand that sort of pressure so it will rip itself open, maybe explosively, with lots of super-heated sugary goo at 121C splattering all over. Not a good thing! So if you do this, leave the cooker to cool as slowly as possible, don't release the steam or use the cold-tap method; I will wrap my cooker in a few tea towels and come back later - I'll leave it overnight just to be safe.

The reason is that water boils at a lower temperature at lower pressure; it takes a long time to boil an egg on a mountain. Same principle applies to 'freeze drying' where under a vacuum the water passes from the solid ice phase to a gas without transiting through the liquid phase.

This is not to be confused with oven temperatures. When you put food in a hot oven at, say, 200C, it remains cooler than 100C due to conduction (the mass is colder) and evaporation (part of the roasting or baking process). If you leave something in the oven too long (we've all been there) it goes black and solid.

My wife has just tried to buy Nestle sweetened condensed from Morrisons but they only had Nestle unsweetened. So she bought three cans of Morrisons own brand sweetened without ring-pull. The pressure cooker is due to arrive tomorrow from Amazon so I'll report back :)

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Welshcookie

Condensed milk

When I say I didn't understand your post I meant that it was written in a difficult to understand way.

The principle behind what you wrote is easy to understand, but probably erroneous as I suspect cooking under pressure is involved in the manufacture of condensed milk. Though I may be wrong.

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Tompeters

Condensed milk

I think you are wrong. I have spent time on two canning lines and while I haven't been involved in the fine detail of the process, the cans pass through heating then cooling/heat recovery in what seems to be a pressure vessel. For a sanity check, consider 15 psi in a ring-pull can. A can is about 3" in diameter, so the area is 7 sq in and the force on the lid would be about 15 times 7 = 50 lb force on the lid of the tin. That's if it's 15 psi, of course, and 121C -- certainly the temperature is high for most foods but in any case it orients us for the condensed milk cooked in the pressure cooker.

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Wendy

Tomps

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Wendy

Tomps

I haven't seen a specialist cookery shop here but I will have a good look at the supermarket next time I go and see if there is something like partially inverted refiners' syrup.

Wendy

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duranderoubaix

Condensed milk

Tromp

If you do cook the condensed milk in a pressure cooker the time will go down from 3-4 hours to 15-20min

place a steamer ring in the pot or a small plate at the bottom of the cooker so that the can is not in direct contact with the heatat the bottom

DO NOT remove the can from the hot water let it cool down first you can do that by letting the pot stand in the zink with cold water

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Tompeters

Condensed milk

Duran'baix, thanks for that. I have found this wiki item http://m.wikihow.com/Make-Dulce-De-Leche that suggests 40 to 50 mins....longer is firmer and darker. I'm cooking one tin as we speak; I was going to leave for 50 mins but will leave for 30 mins as a compromise. Fingers crossed :)

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Welshcookie

Condensed milk

I have never tried this recipe, but I'm throwing it into the mix anyway.

FOR THE MICROWAVE: Pour sweetened condensed milk into large microwave bowl. Cook on MEDIUM (50%) power for 4 minutes, stirring halfway through heating time. Reduce power to MEDIUM-LOW (30%) power; cook for 12 to 16 minutes, stirring with wire whisk every few minutes, until thick and light caramel-coloured. Note: Microwave ovens may vary; adjust timing accordingly.
Makes 10 servings.
x

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Welshcookie

Condensed milk

Also

Caramelised Condensed Milk in the Slow cooker

Place unopened tin(s) of condensed milk in the slow cooker. Pour in enough boiling water to immerse the tin(s) completely.

Cover with the lid and cook on High for 3-4 hours.



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Tompeters

Condensed milk

I made it and it has been chilling in the fridge as did not go with melon, tonight's dessert. Also visited Morrisons myself today and found the entire Nestle range of caramel and normal sweetened 'to cook with' range in ring-pulls, plus a low fat version. Don't know how Thomasia missed them. The Nestle caramelised is £1-75 per can vs the Morrisons normal own brand sweetened at £1-05. We'll taste them side by side but if the same or similar I wouldn't fiddle around with cooking the non-caramelised for the number of times a year we're likely to eat it.

The pressure cooker worked well with potatoes, carrots and swede. Will cook off some beetroot tomorrow. In the past Thomasina has refused to use one....one of those things that is great for some things and clumsy for others....bit like microwaves, in that respect, I suppose? Anyway, she now feels comfortable with the technology so it was all worthwhile in the end.

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Tompeters

Condensed milk (cooked)

We tried the Morrisons own brand sweetened condensed on tinned peaches at lunchtime. Thomasina loved it...then she loves anything caramel. I quite liked it, but wouldn't rave about it...very sweet...I can understand why the Spanish go for it, they have a sweet tooth at least twice as sweet as my (quite sweet) tooth. The colour was brown like Cadbury's milk chocolate. texture, from the fridge, somewhat jelly-like, but the closest I can describe it is like fairly firm Marmite in texture - that, but a bit more blancmange-like. That was 30 mins in a pressure cooker at 15 psi.

 
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