Runny Fruit Pie Filling

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Grannie Cool

Tapioca

How I agree with Tapioca being awful. School dinners in the 50's have a lot to answer for .... custard, sago, semolina,and tapioca all with lumps in and a teacher standing over you until you ate the lot, lumps and all. I have never touched them ever since. As you say...yuck and double yuck.

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Tompeters

Runny Fruit Pie Filling

I use arrowroot for fruit pies because it sets clear but otherwise is (to my palate) identical to cornflour and I use it the same way. A couple of teaspoons in a glass, add some cold water and stir so it's just not a paste any more (you don't want too much water cos you're trying to thicken). Then tip in while stirring into the hot fruit - keep stirring - and back on the heat and you'll see when it's done its thing. If you want any more, rinse the glass and repeat. Easy peasy and foolproof if you keep stirring. Arrowroot is expensive, if you're serving the dish (e.g. apple pie) with cream and ice cream you might as well use cornflour.

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zoom

Runny Fruit Pie Filling

Apologies if I am being really thick... but still learning...

To-date I have made about 4 fruit pies... using a 'double crust?' recipe... pastry to line the tin and a pastry to cover the fruit.

The recipe says to line the tin, add the filling and add the top pastry and then 'rest' in the fridge for an hour before cooking.

Should I be cooking the fruit + arrowroot first and add it hot?

I think I have cracked the patry and the flouvour of the filling... I just need to stop the end product looking like a swimming pool after cooking.

Any advice will be most welcome...

cheers....

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Tompeters

Runny Fruit Pie Filling

I generally make mine while preparing and cooking a dinner so no time to rest. I cook the fruit (very little cooking), thicken with arrowroot and leave to cool on the hob. Then roll pastry and line tin. Spoon the warm fruit onto the patry, cover, prick, glaze with egg or milk/egg and a good sprinkle of sugar over the top. I never aim for a perfect seal...just seems fine. There might be a better way....but it works for me :)

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Queen of Puds

Runny Fruit Pie Filling

I usually cook any pie fillings before baking & allow them to cool before putting onto the bottom layer of pastry. I also try drain excess liquid from the filling, to stop it soaking into the pastry. You can always use it to make a fruit sauce to serve with the pie instead of custard.

The one thing I don't do though is to put a pie into the fridge before baking - I think that might give it increased opportunity to affect the base layer of the pastry.

Why don't you try baking one straight after assembly to see whether that helps?

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Thistledo

School meals

Grannie, you forgot the gravy, lol.

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Thistledo

Runny fruit pie filling

Surely the most important thing to do is chill the pastry BEFORE building the pie, to make it firmer for rolling? That's what I do and never put the finished product in the fridge after it's assembled. Speed is the essence of successful pastry and it wouldn't have time to reach room temperature if everything's ready to go as soon as the chilled pastry is removed from the fridge.
Actually, I don't precook the filling either because I don't like mush but prefer the very slightly al dente texture of the fruit when eating it.
I've tossed cornflour mixed with a little juice or water with green grapes before putting the pastry lid on. Works well.

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Yummy

Thistledo...I am intrigued ...


"I've tossed cornflour mixed with a little juice or water with green grapes before putting the pastry lid on. Works well."


Never heard of this Green grapes thing.....what's it all about ??

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Thistledo

Green grape pie

Was dreading that someone would ask about this. Thanks a bunch Yummy!

It was many years ago I found this recipe - in a magazine I think. Never kept the recipe and have nevere made it since. I do remember though that it was absolutely gorgeous. The pie dish wasn't lined (think that would be asking too much) but I had to mix up a cornflour/water paste to place at the bottom of the dish, tip in the grapes and sugar and place the shortcrust pastry lid on top.

Because you've asked Yummy, I did a very quick Google and there seem to be quite a lot of recipes there.

Now you've made me want to make it again.

You're norty!!!!!

Perhaps another forum member has made something similar?

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Yummy

Green Grape Pie

Ha Ha !! enjoyed learning about this....thanks

See.... doesn't matter how long you are a member of this forum, thers a chance you ALWAYS learn something new :)

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Tompeters

Green grape pie

http://cookingupastory.com/green-grape-pie

Seems that in this context 'green' is under-ripe - i.e. tart and soft pips. In years gone by most grapes were tart but all are now supersweet and seedless. Might by yucky, yummy!

 
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