What books did you read when you were little?

Want to recommend a wonderful book to other members? Please do so ... whether it's food or not, we'd love to find out more.

 
 
 

Previous | Page :  1  2  3  | Next 
avatar
Grannie Cool

Childhood Books.

When quite small I remember reading The Water Babies / Peter Pan / Labybird Books and when I was older loved Enid Blyton's The Famous Five books /Little Women / Jane Eyre / Black Beauty / What Katy Did. And I always had a Rupert Annual at Christmas. Alas I can't remember any others.. mists of time!!!!!

avatar
Kilmory

Books when I was little

Oh yes, Wendy, Anne of Green Gables, Little Women, Heidi and the various sequels, before that anything by Enid Blyton and before that 'William the Pig' who got so thin he could crawl out under the gate - so sad. I was encouraged to read but then chastised for 'always having my head in a book' and not wanting to join in family card games etc! Whatever, I'm glad I had a love of reading then which stays with me now, you're never alone with a book.

Kilmory

What books did you read when you were little?

So true Kilmory, I love the fact that I am an avid reader, and totally agree that you are never alone (or lonely), if you have a book to read. I always have a slight panic if I don't have one on the go, or the net one lined up as I come to the end of one.

avatar
Nausea Bagwash

Children's Books

"For some reason Enid Blyton was banned in our house. Badly written or something....!"
.........
When I was doing teacher training EB was banned as A Very Bad Thing For Children. Limited vocabulary, middle class, childish. They were (much) later rehabilitated when the powers-that-be realised that they were just the ticket for encouraging poorer readers who couldn't cope with more complicated stuff and for young children just starting out with their own books. personally, as a child, I wasn't keen though I can remember being thrilled by some of the one-off mysteries.

As a child I read anything and everything. At around ten I was given "The Summer of the Great Secret" by Monica Edwards for my birthday and subsequently pestered my family for the rest of her "Romney Marsh" books until I was about 14 or 15. I've recently re-read them as a result of the growth of interest in her and they still stand up. Very well written and believable. I didn't go so much onthe "Punchbowl Farm" series but would read them when I'd run out of the "Romney Marsh" ones. Did anyone else read her?

I went to Rye and Rye Harbour some years ago and found them exactly as she describes them in the book (although under different names)

avatar
Nausea Bagwash

Comics and books

"all the Pullein Thompson sisters' books. "
..........
I didn't like the Pullein-Thompson sisters' stuff much although I was a pony-mad child. Or Pat Smythe's pony books - badly written and preachy.

I wasn't wildly impressed with school stories generally but I did collect any Elinor M. Brent-Dyer that I could get my hands on.

I also read L M Montgomery but strangely none of the "Anne" books.

As for comics, I was allowed only one and chose "School Friend" ("The Silent Three" come to mind!). I loved "Eagle", which my uncle took from the first copy and I used to read my friend's "Girl" but wasn't thrilled enough to ask to change from "SF".

In the school holidays, if I went missing for a few hours my mother would phone the local library before she started panicking. I was usually there!

avatar
Nausea Bagwash

School

When I was in top juniors there was a Victorian glass fronted bookcase whic was kept locked. When you'd finished your writing or you got all your sums right, as a reward, you were given the key to the cupboard and could go and choose a book to read for the rest of the lesson while the others beavered away at long division or whatever.

It was a wonderful incentive to get us reading for pleasure (and to get on with our work and finish it) There was a very eclectic assortment of books which had belonged to the teacher and I read all sorts of things I might not have come across on my own.

avatar
sam from worthing

School reading

awwwwww NB.... you just provoked a child hood memory.

if we got all our sums right and did excellent class work etc etc (infant school - as we called them in those days), 3 from each class were picked to go and read to the Headmistress. this happened every week, i think it might have been a friday?

it was both scary and a thrill to be picked.....cos after we read, and if we read well, we got to pick a sweet from a HUGE glass bowl onher desk - it was the best thing ever.

some of the most wonderful times....


I learnt to read by Janet and John, my brother learnt by the red lorry and yellow lorry books.

avatar
Essex Girl

Learning to Read

My first school reading books were the Dick and Dora (Happy Venture) series and I just found a few pages from them on Google!

avatar
Yummy

Janet & John

....for me too Sam, also Mac & Tosh....Happy Days !!

avatar
Gravy Queen

Books you read when little

What a great thread Nor.

I remember at school it was Dick and Nora, with Nip and Fluff.

At home I read every Enid Blyton I could get my hands on and also the What Katy Did series.

I used to buy comics too (does that count) - Bunty and Judy and Whizzer and Chips. OOh remember the Four Marys and Wee Slavey?

I've remained an avid reader ever since, and like you Nor, I have to have a book on the go, I have 3 on my bedside table, I must read in bed before I go to sleep. (cook books make it to the bedroom too).

avatar
JaneMR

What books did you read when you were little?

All those messages bring back happy memories for me.

But what is happening? I spoke to my 12 year old god-daughter last night who was reading "a great book about a dead girl who is trying to find out whether she committed suicide or was murdered by one of her friends".

What are we doing to our children's minds? They read books like this and the television is full of adverts for killing games. No wonder they get confused (to put it kindly). How can this trend be reversed?

avatar
Wendy

Books

I mentioned this to my daughter a mother of 3 boys and she said they know not to kill people in real life. So I don't think the trend can be reversed.

Wendy

avatar
JaneMR

Books

Whilst I realise that most children know not to kill in real life, I do not think that the constant barrage of death is a good thing.

I played Cowboys and Indians when I was young, I had a toy gun, but I was not subject to the volume of violence that exists today. I do believe that it can devalue life for some individuals.

Books - and comics on Tuesday

Some great replies on this thread, and lots of other book titles that I had forgotten I had read!

GQ's reply also reminded me about comics. What a massive treat they were for us. We were allowed one comic a week, and with there being four children most areas were covered off to keep us all happy. My dad used to bring them home with him and I can remember us all lined up at the window on a Tuesday evening, waiting for the first glimpse of him come down the road.

Jane - do let us know what books you read as well.

avatar
violet eyes

comics

Can't remember the titles of the books I read when younger apart from Janet and John at school but I did read comics. The first one I remember getting was Jack and Jill. I liked Harold Hare with his tidy house, don't laugh but I wanted to be like him. After that came the Dandy, Beano, and then Bunty. Then I grew up and read Jackie.

 
Previous | Page :  1  2  3  | Next 

Return to Homepage
Visit the Delia Online Cookery School with Waitrose
Click here to go to Waitrose.com

 

 




NetObserver
CMS solutions by REDtechnology.com