Measuring scales?

Keen to know which brand to buy? Or want to share a great purchase with the rest of us? This is the place to do it...

 
 
 

Page :  1  2  | Next 
avatar
DavesBonnyLass

Measuring scales?

Hope this question isn't too silly, but what kind of scale should I buy? The other day I had to measure 3.5 grams of yeast. How on earth do you measure something so small! Do I need a tiny, sensitive scale for tiny bits and then another for larger quanities, like cups of flour, sugar, beans, pasta, etc?

Also, for electronic scales, as the battery begins to wear down, do they loose their accuracy, kind of like a flashlight/torch begins to dim when the battery gets old?

Finally, do you have a recommended brand(s?

Thanks!

avatar
Welshcookie

Tiny quantities

Sometimes when you have to weigh tiny quantities it is easier to weigh a larger quantity and divide it up. 30g of yeast is do-able, then divide it in 4. Yeast is OK if you use a slightly larger or smaller quantity. It will accommodate the difference.
I have old-fashioned balance scales so my measuring is always slightly inaccurate. It doesn't make a heck of a difference!

avatar
Dottie May

Tiny Quantities

Yonks ago I bought a small weighing scales which I used when I was on a diet and is very useful to weigh out small quantities. Not sure if they are still available from Weight Watchers or similar. I believe they still sell a set of measuring spoons to measure out small quantities of sugar etc.

avatar
Kayb

Weights

Hi DBL, I have just checked the weight of a sachet of fast acting yeast and it says 7gms, or 2 teaspoons - so 3.5 gms should be 1/2 a sachet, or 1 teaspoon.
hope this helps
Karen

avatar
Welshcookie

Yeast

Silly me, I thought the question was about fresh yeast.

If it is dried yeast, of course, it is half a packet! Doesn't need to be weighed.

avatar
Kayb

dried yeast

Hi Welsh Cookie, I automatically thought of dried yeast as, when I used to use fresh yeast the amounts used were 3ozs or more. (and that dates me!!) and many people now use breadmakers.
Karen

avatar
DavesBonnyLass

Thanks for the responses, but...

Maybe I shouldn't have mentioned weighing yeast as some responses are a little off topic, but I do really appreciate all who responded.

Weight of any ingredient could be important. Yeast is pretty much the same grain size, so using measuring spoons would suffice. But, for example, there is a difference in grain size between, for example, caster sugar and table sugar; coarse sea salt and table salt, etc.

I also wondered whether chefs have a small scale and a larger one, or just one, and if people find that electronic scales loose their accuracy as the battery wears down.

avatar
Noreen, Board Moderator

Electronic scales

They don't slow down, they just stop completely, and it will always happen mid-weigh!

I have a set that has a battery marker so you can see how much there is left, and I always make sure I have spare batteries, too many times they have gone at the crucial moment, to get caught out again!

avatar
Welshcookie

Measuring scales

I suspect that anything we suggested would not be accurate enough for you, if you are worried about grain size.
Do you remember the old trick question about which is the heavier, a pound of feathers or a pound of lead?
Life really is too short to worry about 1 gramme here or there!

avatar
violet eyes

scales

If you want to measure minute quanities maybe the scales that are used for measuring drugs would be useful to you.
I have some Salter electronic scales and use them daily and the batteries seem to last for ever, well almost.

avatar
Tompeters

Measuring scales

Hi, electronic scales tend to be accurate until they stop working. But with any scales, electronic or traditional, there are three issues: Accuracy, repeatability and linearity over the range. Most cookery measurements are not very critical to absolute weight, but to relative weight. i.e. the ingredients work well in a certain ratio. It's very true of egg recipes and I always weigh the egg and adjust the other ingredients to match. These days we have our own hens and we weigh each egg in grammes when we collect them and write date and weight on the shell.

I generally weigh all liquids rather than use a jug. Far quicker and more accurate. For most liquids I find you don't need to adjust for density but you can if you like.

As for very small weights, I have, as well as my electronic kitchen scales, a 0 - 20g scale and a 1 - 100g scale both came with calibrating weights as well. I have never (yet) used those scales for cookery, I use them for medicines for us and the animals.

I use a home breadmaker every day and use the Panasonic scoop that came with it for yeast, salt and sugar. It's the only time I use volumetric measures, I think. With a breadmaker you cannot add a little more flour or water to fine-tune the dough so initial accuracy is very critical. If baking by hand the experienced cook can do a better job by assessing the texture of the dough.

For me, old fashioned scales are ornaments from a bygone age. But others love them....each to his own, home cooking is supposed to be fun, not a book of rules.

avatar
SonyaK

Measuring scales?


" With a breadmaker you cannot add a little more flour or water to fine-tune the dough so initial accuracy is very critical. If baking by hand the experienced cook can do a better job by assessing the texture of the dough."

I always check the dough in my bread maker when it is in the kneading phase!! I can stop the machine and add a teaspoon (or several) of flour or water, depending on the texture of the dough.

My old bread maker had a 'pause' button that I used checking the dough. My present one doesn't have that, so I turn it off at the power if I want to stop it. The machine has a 'power failure' feature, so it comes back on at the same point in it's cycle if it's only turned off for a short time.

avatar
Tompeters

Measuring scales

Hi Sonya, That's interesting and makes sense. Mine also has auto restart after a brief cut but should be easy to add flour or water during the knead. With a breadmaker, making a standard (Panasonic type 1) loaf, how would you describe the texture? Sticky, slightly floury,...?

avatar
Welshcookie

Dough texture

Just right?? It comes with experience!

avatar
SonyaK

Dough texture

Hard to describe - as Welshcookie says it is experience!!
Have you looked in the machine and seen what usually happens.

Not sure what a 'Panasonic type 1 loaf' is, but in my machine I'd say that when it's all come together it looks smooth and a bit shiny and feels very slightly sticky.
Like it would be OK to take out and knead by hand on a well floured board.
Any help?

 
Page :  1  2  | Next 

Return to Homepage
Visit the Delia Online Cookery School with Waitrose
Click here to go to Waitrose.com

 

 




NetObserver
CMS solutions by REDtechnology.com