Electric Potato Peelers

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

Has anyone any experience of these. I don't have a suitable Kenwood so it'd have to be stand alone. I'm really interested in de-skinning smaller new potatoes of the sort that don't scrape well and you lose too much with a normal peeler.

Many thanks

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Welshcookie

New potatoes

Don't you boil them in their skins?

I understand the problem with an electric potato peeler is that the potatoes have to be a very regular shape.

OTOH I find potato peeling very quick with a Y-peeler.

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

We are not fond of skin-on small news. There are 'baby' - i.e. dwarf variety - and there are small regular variety and we find the dwarfs the worst of all.

I haven't yet found a electric 'peeler' for domestic use that has acceptable reviews .... wondering if anyone else has.

As for the Y peeler, I can't get on with them but I'm fine with the traditional ones but only buy the very best (once or twice a decade). Trouble is with very small pots a peeler takes such a high % of the total mass of potato :(

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Welshcookie

New potatoes

Talk about making a virtue out of a vice. Charlottes are usually potatoes that would not normally grade because of their size (too small). They are not 'new' potatoes and usually their skin is set.

But I bet lots of people buy them thinking they are new.

Me, I like skin-on potatoes; or what we call Irish potatoes.

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Thistledo

ELECTRIC POTATO PEELERS

Can't abide any potato cooked in their skins, other than a jacket spud or very new ones where you can rub the skins off with your thumbs.
Afraid potatoes cooked in their skins remind me of a neighbour, during WW2, boiling up peelings, etc for her chickens. The smell was foul (no pun intended)and I still smell that now if I get a whiff of anyone leaving their skins on whilst cooking.

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violet eyes

electric potato peelers

I have decided not to buy any more bags of new/baby/salad potatoes being sold out of season, as in the winter months. They are just small potatoes that have to be peeled and they are too small for that. I thought the point of new potatoes was that the skins just rub off or scrape easily like they do in the summer.
I will stick with peeling old potatoes in the winter and leave the new potatoes to be enjoyed in season.
I have seen potato peelers that you spin round to remove the peel but don't know if they are any good. Maybe ask at a chip shop they must use them for speed.

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Nenna

potato peelers

I had an attachment to my Kenwood Chef many years ago which I thought was going to save me a lot of work with a young family who ate a LOT of potatoes. But it was useless, and quite expensive to buy, so I got rid of it and I have used a manual peeler ever since, or a MAN, my husband!

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

It's for the little ones I am wondering about using an electric peeler for. I've stopped buying the little specialty ones like you but we've had quite a few small ones along with the normal ones in our own harvest this year and if we could easily peel the little ones we could use less expensive shop bought ones when ours run out.

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Kayb

Spud Peelers

Hello Tomps, I'm not sure if this is what you are after, but there is a firm called 'Coopers of Stortford' (can't give you the website here - but google it) who do an electric peeler similar to the hand operated one that lakeland sells. It looks like what I would call 'a fun piece of equipment' but not neccessary, unless you have arthritis.
Have fun in your search
Karen

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

Kayb - Thanks, that is SO cool (as my daughters would put it) I just have to have one! Here's the url

http://tinyurl.com/lhxcjvk

I'm not sure that it's much good for those tiny potatoes but my wife has a very weak wrist so might be a godsend for her. But anyway, it's simply amazing!

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Yummy

Electric Potato Peeler

I had the attachment with my Kenwood......absolute nightmare to clean. In fact took longer to clean the damn thing than to stand and scrape the potatoes. Also, the potatoes always ended up like the ones in tins, slightly rough, not smooth like when you take the time to scrape them properly.
So absolutely would NOT recommend ...sorry !

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

Thanks, Yummy. I feared as much. I can scrape normal-sized news fine, and peel normal-sized olds by hand. It's those tiddly things I want to be able to de-skin if only for mash. Mind you, if cleaning is hard.....

When I was around ten, there was a water powered peeler at school and I think it had a carborundum like bowl. They used it daily for years to feed around 150 boys breakfast, lunch and dinner (tea). Bit big for Mrs Tompeters and me!

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Yummy

Potato Peelers

Tompeters, if it is only for very occasional use, have you tried rubbing the skins off with one of the green scourers pads ? I have used this method before and it works. use a good clean green scourer, cup it into your hand and rub the small potato against it, turning as you go. They don't last very long but long enough to do a panful of tatties. and much cheaper than buying an electric gizmo which will probably end up at the back of the cupboard !!

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

That's a thought, Yummy. I have used them in the past. I have found an Elgento peeler in my local hardware store at £19.99 (£28.99 Amazon free delivery with Prime). Some of the reviews are excellent and sound balanced. I'll take a gamble and buy one tomorrow and report back. Goes without saying that we'd all love a perfect potato peeler!

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Tompeters

Electric Potato Peelers

I got the Elgento 010 today £19.99 from our local hardware store (way cheaper than any online source I could find so it pays to look around). I read the instructions very carefully.

I peeled 500g of very small new pots from the garden. It seems that it's not just weight, the covering over the blades should leave small gaps between pots so don't just weigh and toss in! The instructions tell you how much water to add - a bit ambiguous so look carefully. Essentially the water level should be just below the stainless blades but lapping onto the plastic blade disc.

You need to make sure you have the lid on the right way round as there is a push-rod that interlocks the motor if the lid isn't on. You could fit it the wrong way round (and it wouldn't work) or you could even lose the push-rod (oh dear).

They tell you for good reason to keep your hand on the lid while operating to keep it all stable. Turn on the switch for three minutes. You must not use for more than four minutes without giving it a good rest or it will burn out. The area near the motor was warm after use so they mean what they say. My pots took 3 minutes.

Obviously it won't remove eyes, cuts, or burrowing insects, and it leaves any cleft in the potato unpeeled - as you would expect. To finish off nicely, just go over quickly with a veg knife.

My pots came out a bit on the rough side but they made perfect mash. I think they'd be fine buttered, and might even work for roasts - maybe even crisp them up a bit?

It is very light and has an integral cord store. I'm keeping on top of the highest shelf as it's so light. It's quite nicely made albeit on a budget.

I'm not planning (yet) to use them on premium potatoes but I am absolutely delighted. We are nearly through our home-grown spuds for this year, sadly (must grow far more next year) but this will encourage me to buy some of the less expensive small cheap pots from the shops.

 
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