Room temperature from the fridge

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DandE

Room temperature from the fridge

In the video course, Delia often talks about using eggs at room temperature (and for good reason).

In summer, and overseas, we have to keep our eggs in the fridge.

Coming in late and thinking of a quick-and-easy meal (again, per video), it rather negates the effect if we have to wait for the eggs to reach room temperature!

What adjustments should one make in order to use cold-eggs, or are there ways of bringing the eggs 'up to temperature' more quickly and without actually cooking them?

Please advise,
=dn

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Welshcookie

Eggs

Why not put them out of the fridge before you go out?

Eggs can always be placed in tepid water to warm them up.

To be honest I think you could use them straight from the fridge. This is cooking not a precise scientific experiment.

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Tompeters

Eggs from fridge

My mum always kept her eggs in the fridge and we made no allowance for that. I suppose a boiled, fried or poached egg is going to have harder-set white for a medium-set yolk? I think WC is right on this...I'd put in water at room temp while preparing everything else for the meal first, giving time to warm.

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DandE

Eggs

Out of the fridge before leaving - that would require being organised (and foretelling what will happen during the day). Omelettes and similar are good meals to have on those days when arrive home far too late and are desperate to eat and sleep...

Like the idea of warming them, presumably gently (else would be "cooking") whilst organising everything else.

Thank you.

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DandE

Eggs from fridge

"Room temperature" seemed important because Delia mentioned it. Yet most us do seem to work directly from fridge to mixing bowl...

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SonyaK

Room temperature from the fridge

""Room temperature" seemed important because Delia mentioned it. Yet most us do seem to work directly from fridge to mixing bowl..."

I think room temperature eggs are supposed to mix in better with other ingredients, although I don't worry about it if I forget to take them out of the fridge!
Cold eggs are easier to separate into yolks and whites.

Cold eggs left for about 10 mins in warm water, while you get organised to cook, should be warm enough. So not too much organisation required:)

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Tompeters

Eggs from fridge

Of course don't keep them in water for very long unless they are to be well-cooked. Apparently water will, in time, permeate from outer shell into the egg taking any contamination with it. With our own eggs (hens are salmonella vaccinated) we keep at room temp and wash the occasional dirty eggs under the tap and clean immediately before cracking.

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Welshcookie

Dirty eggs

Make sure the hens have plenty of clean bedding in the nest box and discourage the hens from roosting in the box.

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flo44

Room temperature

I recommend placing the cold eggs in a bowl of warm water for a few minutes as well. If I'm mixing a cake batter, i.e., sugar and eggs, I find the mixture comes together better than when using cold eggs.

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Welshcookie

Eggs at room temperature

I am sure most people will have noticed that supermarket eggs are displayed for sale at room temperature rather than in cold storage, so why do so many people keep their eggs in the fridge?

Eggs will keep for three weeks at normal room temperature.

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flo44

Room temperature

In the U.S . eggs are kept in open or closed refrigerated showcases. I just googled it and the Egg Board says eggs shouldn't be unrefrigerated for more than 2 hours. It's to safeguard against salmonella poisoning.

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Welshcookie

Salmonella

How can it safeguard against salmonella if you refrigerate eggs?

Eggs/chickens are tested for salmonella in the UK. Refrigerating eggs will not protect you if it is in the egg. In the main it is foreign eggs that carry it. I think they are used in catering and are not sold to UK consumers.

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SonyaK

Room temperature from the fridge

" How can it safeguard against salmonella if you refrigerate eggs? "

In the fridge the salmonella (if present) don't multiply, as they do at room temperature. So it means there are far less salmonella in the refrigerated eggs, so less likely to cause problems.
In well cooked eggs any salmonella will be killed, so won't cause problems.

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Welshcookie

Salmonella

Yes, fridge temperatures can safeguard against the rapid multiplication of salmonella, but it cannot safeguard against it per se.

One would hope that there are no eggs infected with it in the UK. Certainly not available to shoppers anyway.

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Tompeters

Eggs from fridge

I've done a bit of research from online sources including .gov.uk sites, the lion site, etc.

All commercial and most hobby hens in the UK have been vaccinated against salmonella. It seems that around 0.25% of eggs are still infected, often on the shell and get into food through mis-handling. Salmonella bacteria are killed by thorough cooking but not making mayo or soft eggs.

In perspective, 0.25% - maybe one infected egg per annum for most people - is unacceptable for those with some illnesses or compromised immune systems.

Commercial caterers are required to refrigerate as part of a handling protocol.

 
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