Recipes bringing back memories

Welcome to our Coffee Break forum! Here you can chat to other members, not just about cooking, food and recipes, but anything that takes your fancy. Share your stories, culinary or otherwise. So. What’s on your mind today?

 
 
 

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feathered

Recipes bringing back memories

This summer I bought "The summer collection" because my mum cooked from it - sadly I lost her a few years ago and I regret not having asked her for some of her signature recipes. I remembered that she loved the Summer collection and bought myself the book. Cooking and eating those recipes has brought back so many memories of her. It's also made me realise how fabulous Delia is (hence my arrival here!)

Since then I've spoken to friends who have similar food memories and cook recipes to remember their mums.

I just wondered about other posters here . . . what recipes stir up memories for you?

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The Cat's Mother

Memories

Loads of things bring back memories of my parents - my mother was not a great cook, but I really loved Sunday roasts. Wherever I was living I always returned home at weekends - wouldn't miss her roast beef and yorkshire pudding (or lamb and mint sauce, or chicken, or pork with crackling and apple sauce) for anything!! Crumpets for tea on cold winter days. Christmas Dinner - we were always about 12 of us and the roast turkey and all the trimmings were wonderful. My cooking is not bad, but for me nothing compares to the food my mother used to provide!!!!

The most evocative memory is Monday lunch (just mother and I, my father being at the office) - this would be cold meat from Sunday's joint, with mashed potato and gravy in the winter and salad and new potatoes (from the garden) in summer. This meal was always accompanied by the smell of washing - Monday was the traditional day to do this in those days.

There are many more memories of course but those are the ones that come to mind just now.

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feathered

memories

How lovely,
the thought of crumpets make me feel hungry now - such comfort food. I love that you have the smell of washing tied in with your food memories too.

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Dottie May

Recipes bringing back memories

While WW2 was on we had food rationing but my Mum was such a good cook she was able to produce lovely food. One dish I remember was Roast Rabbit and Rabbit Casserole. Dad was a keen gardener and also kept chickens so we had a good supply of veg and eggs but my sister and I had to be persuaded that when we had chicken it wasn't one of ours.

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feathered

Poor Peter Rabbit!

So did you mind eating rabbit when you were a child?
I think it's becoming quite fashionable at the moment. I've seen it on a few food programmes. I've never tried it - but would probably give it a go. Maybe I wouldn't tell my children what it was though!

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Dottie May

Recipes bringing back memories

No, we didn't seem to mind eating Rabbit. Because we lived in the country and before we had heard of Mixamatosis (sp) they were always running around wild in the fields whereas our chickens seemed to be our pets and all had names. At the time I don't suppose I would have liked to have eaten a pet rabbit.

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Honey

Recipe memories

One of Delia's recipes that always evokes memories of Christmas at my mother-in-law's is Delia's sausage rolls. They were so popular with the whole family. I think it was the recipe she had in her Complete Illustrated Cookery Course which was THE book to have back in the 70's. It was the most requested thing that my mother-in-law made... everyone asked her to make them. In those days you couldn't buy ready made pastry and she would freeze the block of butter, hold it in her hand (wrapped in foil) and then grate the butter to make flaky pastry. Bless her, she was the only one who had the patience to do them.

H x

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violet eyes

jus rol pastry

My Mum used jus rol pastry in the 60's to make her sausage rolls. I can remember making flaky pastry at school, dotting all the fat over the pastry and all that folding. Can't be bothered doing that nowadays not when you can buy it ready made.

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Lynn from Wigan

The Great Northern Cookbook

My sister bought me The Great Northern Cookbook by Sean Wilson (he used to be Martin Platt in Coronation Street) and it has stirred up many memories of my mum and grandma both of whom are sadly no longer here. It contains recipes such as Taiterhash (potato hash for the uninitiated !), proper Lancashire Hotpot etc as well as all the real old-fashioned puddings. It really is worth buying.

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Wendy

Food memories

My Mum used to make the most wonderful thick soups filled with almost any vegetable she could get her hands on then add lentils or barley. She would add dumplings or hot boiled potatoes to it and believe me when you had eaten a bowlful of this you felt full. I wish she was still here because I could just eat some now!

I recall on one occasion her Yorkshire pudding didn't rise so it was served as a dessert with sugar sprinkled on. She used to say to me years later, 'After all the Yorkshire puddings I made you can only remember that one'. I had to reply 'Yes'.

Like Violet Eyes I remember doing pastry like that at school. Our Domestic Science (as it was called then) made us make meringue with just a fork and the egg white on a plate. It took an age to do it but her comment was you may not have an egg whisk but you will always have plates and forks!

Wendy

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SonyaK

Domestic Science

"Our Domestic Science (as it was called then) made us make meringue with just a fork and the egg white on a plate. It took an age to do it but her comment was you may not have an egg whisk but you will always have plates and forks!"

But would you want to bother with a meringue? :)

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Wendy

Domestic Science teacher

No! I certainly would not have bothered at all making meringue that way but we did as we were told then and when the teacher said meringue with the use of a fork and plate then meringue with the use of a fork and plate it had to be!!

Wendy :)

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SonyaK

Recipes bringing back memories

Yes, I understand that Wendy:) I did as I was told too (well, most of the time!!).
I was just pointing our that we were taught some very impractical things - not much use later, in 'real life' !!

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Wendy

Domestic science

I agree fully with you. Indeed, one of the first things I bought when I got married was an egg whisk!

The self-same teacher taught us how wash, starch, iron and fold shirts,etc. and to make a dirndl skirt and a couple of school uniform dresses we also had to make a cap and apron for the cookery lessons.

I wonder what she would make of all the appliances that make life easier today.

Wendy

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violet eyes

DS

One of the first things I bought before I got married was a washing up bowl from Timothy Whites. They sold them as sets and if I remember rightly tied up with a bow. I think my life was mapped out then. It played a big part in my early days of married life.
Many things learnt in DS and other lessons stay with us through out our lives. Who could fotget the lesson in washing shirts, teacloths etc. I knew that bowl would come in handy.
I often wonder what our Mums and Grans would think of the world today and all these time saving things we now all take for granted and not just in the kitchen.
But how much time have we gained and what do we do with it?

 
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