Condensed milk

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Wendy

Condensed milk

Lindsey very kindly gave me a recipe for chocolate frosting using tins of boiled condensed milk.

A couple of questions. When it has boiled and cooled down can it kept to use at a later date?

Is it OK to boil tins with ring pulls?

Should the lid be on the pan or not?

Sorry if I sound a bit dumb, I've never done this before!

Wendy


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Welshcookie

Condensed milk

I'm not sure about ring-pulls, I've only done it with 'normal' tins.

Make sure there is plenty of water in the pan, this is important. I'm not sure why tins have to be put on their side, I've never done that.

Put the lid on the pan to cut down evaporation. Top up the pan if necessary.

When the tins are cold mark them in felt-tip so you know they have been treated. They will keep for years - literally. You can do as many as your saucepan will hold comfortably, always ensuring they are submerged, or if they float that they don't touch the bottom of the pan.

I see from the dates on my tins, I did my last lot four years ago so my memory is a bit hazy about whether they float or not!

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Rasdora

Chocolate cream

Hello Wendy, I have recently registered and have seen your questions regarding the above. I have lived in Italy for many, many years (see my profile) and I suggest you use 300 gr of plain chocolate and 150 mls of fresh single or whipping cream (panna fresca in the dairy section of your supermarket. . Heat cream to boiling point, pour over chocolate broken into squares in a bowl and stir to combine and melt. Cool then chiol in the fridge. Use to fill and cover sponge cake. Can be whipped if necessary once chilled. Have been using this method for years.
Ciao, Rasdora

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Wendy

Rasdora

Welcome to the site. I mentioned I could get fresh cream but when it's whipped it doesn't seem to hold its shape then collapses. Having said that I have never considered mixing with chocolate because I thouht it would still collapse but I shall give it a try.

Thanks for that

Wendy

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Rasdora

Chocolate cream

No, it will not collapse. The chocolate combines with the cream to give to increase volume and consistancy, There is also a product available that you add to plain whipping cream (I prefer it slightly sweetened with icing sugar). I don't know if I can mention the name here. It is very effective and keeps the whipped cream fim for filling and covering - very good for profiteroles. Let me know how I can send you the brand name.

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Wendy

Welshcookie/Rasdora

Boiling the tins of condensed milk worked. I kept the gas quite low because of the ring-pull tin. The ring did come off when I was openeing the tin though and as the tin-opener isn't up to much I struggled with it but managed it in the end.

I now use your method of cooling my cakes so they don't stick to the rack now, so thank you for that.

Once again, thank you for your advice.

Rasdora

My email address in in my profile, I would be grateful for the name of the additive.

Wendy

Wendy

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Tompeters

Rasdora

It's fine to name brands or names here. I too would like to know the product, if you could post it here?

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Rasdora

CREAM

Well, if you are sure it is OK to mention brand names - would not want to be accused of advertising! This Italian product is called PANNAFIX by the Paneangeli company. One sachet is whisked into 250 mls of single or whipping cream and whipped until very thick. The cream will then not collapse.
Another tip is to add a generous 100 gr of mascarpone to 250 mls of single or whipping cream and whip until thick. Hope this is of help,

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duranderoubaix

condensed milk

Hi Wendy

Firstly why do you want to cook condensed milk if you can already buy caramel?
Cooking condensed milk takes many hours 4/5 hours cooking one can and then you end up with caramel at the end.
but if you do want to cook it you can cook it in a normal pot with the lid on just make sure you watch the water level because you will have a kitchen full of caramel if the can explodes ps happened to me.
or you can cook it in a pressure cooker reducing the cooking time

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duranderoubaix

condensed milk

Hi Wendy

Firstly why do you want to cook condensed milk if you can already buy caramel?
Cooking condensed milk takes many hours 4/5 hours cooking one can and then you end up with caramel at the end.
but if you do want to cook it you can cook it in a normal pot with the lid on just make sure you watch the water level because you will have a kitchen full of caramel if the can explodes ps happened to me.
or you can cook it in a pressure cooker reducing the cooking time

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duranderoubaix

chocolate cream

just use equal amounts of cream to chocolate and heat it up till its melted and when its cooled mix a tablespoon of golden syrup with it to give it a shiny look and use that to cover your cake easy as pie

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Wendy

Duranderoubaix

I wanted a chocolate filling without eggs and we don't like buttercream. I had to boil the condensed milk as the caramel one is not available here. It turned out very well as the recipe came from 'Ask Lindsey'. Golden syrup is not available here either.

I have been given a couple of suggestions and will be giving those a try, I will add yours but it will have to be without the syrup!

Although I can get fresh cream it's not always available, it's rather hit and miss whether the supermarket has it although it seems to be getting better. I had a problem whipping the fresh cream as it didn't hold it's shape but another poster has given me a solution to that.

Thank you for your input.

Wendy

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Tompeters

Condensed milk

Lindsey, thank you :)

By, I was wondering the same so did some googling. It's called in Spain Dulce de leche and is a popular dessert. Forum rules don't allow links to other recipe sites but a wiki one includes technique using a pressure cooker that only takes 50 mins (if you need heat in your home anyway, all to the good, but not on a baking hot summer's day! If you pressure cook the temp will rise above 100C internally and if you let the pressure out of the cooker before the tin is less than 100C, the contents will boil unless the pressure rises to around 15 psi (that is a LOT and is likely to burst any tin, ringpull or ordinary).

I keep meaning to buy a pressure cooker so will do at the weekend and try this out.

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Tompeters

Condensed milk

T&L Golden Syrup is, of course, available at a horrible price from Brit shops in parts of Italy, and delis, but I was able to get 'partially inverted refiners' syrup' (which is essentially Golden Syrup) in a regular cooking specialist shop in Fiumicino -- targeted at Italians, not ex-pats and at a reasonable price. You'd have to check the translation into Italian, it was some years ago I did it and have forgotten. Hope that helps.

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Welshcookie

Condensed milk


If you pressure cook the temp will rise above 100C internally and if you let the pressure out of the cooker before the tin is less than 100C, the contents will boil unless the pressure rises to around 15 psi (that is a LOT and is likely to burst any tin, ringpull or ordinary).

I don't understand this post

 
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