Homemade spreadable butter

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Wendy

Homemade spreadable butter

Violet Eyes very kindly posted the proportions of Lurpak spreadable butter for me but I can't find anything similar here. I googled it and an American site suggests about half cup butter to quarter cup oil or half and half oil and water. It went on to say that it was unsuitable for baking because of the water so if I use all oil would that be OK or if not if I do it to the Lurpak proportions about 70% butter to 25% oil would that work? I don't want to make any if it's unsuitable for baking.

Thank you

Wendy

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Welshcookie

Butter

I don't quite get it. Why don't you just use butter?

I'm sure where you are if you leave butter out for 5 minutes it will be spreadable.

Frankly I will not be buying Delia's book if she specifies a particular butter. I am very particular about the butter I use. I choose not to use butter with added oil. I was just about to use the word 'contaminated' there, but that might be contentious.

I do hope it is not palm oil which is used in so many foods now.

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Yummy

Using butter

I agree with Welshcookie, just use butter, perhaps Delia is giving an easy option for mixing, but I would normally zap it in the micorwave just to make it a bit softer and easier to beat anyway.
I certainly wouldn't go faffing about trying to emulate something as basic as butter.

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violet eyes

homemade spreadable butter

Hi Wendy,
I understand your question about how to make your butter spreadable but don't really know the answer. I suppose adding oil would make sense as that's what is in the Lurpak but how they do it I'm not sure
But to be honest with you I wasn't that keen on the Lurpak spreadable and I don't think I will buy it again.
I just wanted to try it in Delia's cake recipe to see what it was like. I didn't think the cake tasted any better than using stork but maybe others will disagree.
We also used it on fresh bread and it was a little greasy, so will use the real stuff in future.
We have been getting through rather a lot of butter recently since reading that it wasn't that bad for you health wise.
But the scales say the opposite so I must cut down again.
Why do you want spreadable butter?

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Wendy

Spreadable butter homemade

Thanks for the replies. WC although butter softens very quickly in the summer, winters can be cold thus making butter difficult to spread. I was asking more out of curiosity than anything else and like VE wanted to try it out but I don't think I'll bother I will do as Yummy suggest and soften it in the m/w. I have to say I prefer my butter without any additions.

Wendy

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Noreen, Board Moderator

Spreadable butter

Welshcookie - Delia only recommends Lurpak because it has the highest butter content (the oil is vegetable, by the way), and the added oil helps to retain moistness.

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violet eyes

palm oil

I've noticed palm oil creeping into things. I will try not to buy it if possible. Before I bought my breadmaker we used a sunflower spread which I thought was a good one as it had those omega 3 things but I have now read that it includes 12% palm oil and it's also out of date as it's a while since I bought it. I hate to think how many packets of butter I've got through.

Wendy, stick to pure butter, it does taste better.
The cat got at the bowl of tuna the other day, no one but me saw it, I wondered what to do, carry on using it or open another tin. I opened another tin and gave the licked one to him.
What would you have done??

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Tompeters

Spreadable butter

Palm oil is very high in saturated fats and while it doesn't have cholesterol the body makes cholesterol from it. However, it is lower in saturates than butter.

Mccance and Widdowson 'Composition of Foods' is the industry standard text and is available online, just google.

These dietary choices are not so significant if you don't eat a lot of the food. Delicious though Delia's cakes are I doubt anyone is going to get more than 0.01% of their annual fat/calorie intake from them! These things only become significant when you use them often...like on your breakfast toast, mashed pots and veg.

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Wendy

Palm oil & cats

The next time I buy spread I shall check for palm oil, isn't it a good oil? The American site uses canola oil or any other oil you choose.

Having 4 cats there wouldn't have been any tuna left in the bowl!! But I would have done what you did let them have the dregs in the tin. I had 3 attempts at breakfast one day when I left a bowl of cornflakes (without milk) on the side to come in the room to find a cat eating them. The cornflakes were given to the dogs and I had another bowl, filled that with cornflakes and milk, went to the fridge to get more milk to find cat eating those. Got another bowl of cornflakes and cat jumped up tipping bowl of cornflakes over me, the table and himself! Now he has his own bowl of cornflakes! To top it all when clearing up the mess another cat began to drink my coffee!

Wendy

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Tompeters

Veg oils

Wendy, canola is rapeseed (one particular variety). It's a matter of cost and taste. Palm is cheap. Olive is expensive. We use sunflower for general oil in the kitchen, groundnut for a flavour-neutral oil and olive when we want that distinctive flavour. Now that hydrogenated fats have been largely removed from foods, I doubt whether many of us will have a positive or negative effect by changing oils. If you fry in oil often, that'd be different, I suppose.

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violet eyes

palm oil

Isn't the reason why we are often advised to not use palm oil because of the amount of rain forests that are being destroyed, that's a bad thing isn't it?
What to eat these days is a minefield. One day eat this next day don't eat that. Years ago we ate what was put on our plates and were happy.
Wendy, naughty cats :o)

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Tompeters

Veg oils

VE -- Yes, you're right though food manufacturers have over the years developed harmful foods to serve their ends... inexpensive to make and very palatable, encouraging us to eat more than is good for us. How about potato crisps particularly five or more years ago. When I was a boy, legend had it that Mr Smith made good when he added the blue salt sachet; made people drink more in pubs. Don't know if it's true.

My dad visited a crisp factory in the 1930s and he never ate another crisp - the factory roofs and lights were caked in greasy gunge that would obey the law of gravity from time to time, right into the fryers! It's not like that today...I have been into many food factories.

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Wendy

Vegetable oils

Thanks Tomps for that info, it's good to know.

I totally with you VE on advice. I'm beginning to tire of the phrases 'Experts say...' 'Scientists have found...' 'Research shows...' Be it food or drink I dread to think what harm I've done to myself with what I've eaten over the years!

Wendy

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Thistledo

Homemade speadable butter/cats

VE, I can't believe you would even ask such a queston, as to whether bin the licked tuna, or carry on using it. Cat's saliva carries more bacteria/germs than a dog! Not good.

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violet eyes

cats and tuna

I've had cats all my life apart from when the children were very young and I'm sure I must have caught the odd germ from one of them. So it's a good job we didn't eat the tuna.
I know about cats and litter trays but not about their saliva. I will do some research on the topic.

 
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