moushakka is a traditional Turkish meal.

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isikneslihan

moushakka is a traditional Turkish meal.

the true nomenclature of this meal is Musakka and it is common meal for Turks. Also this meal can cook in Greek because their land is separeted from Turkey so it is originated from Ottoman Empaires' kitchen.Once upon a time these two culture was lived together but Turks' history and culture is mimics by Greeks. Also baklava, cacık, fıstık, turkish d&"246;ner is taken off by greeks.

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Biggles !

Fistik ?

Hello, I think Turkish cuisine is fantastic and all the best recipes move around the world, don't they :0)

Is fistik the green marzipan?

I would certainly welcome some more Turkish recipes, perhaps you could put some recipes in your profile and then they would show in the Your Recipes section we have here on site.

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Chazza

Fistik

Isn't it marzipan made from pistachios?

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Saffy

Turkish recipes

Yes please. I've cooked a handful of Turkish recipes and would love to try some more. I'm a big fan of Greek food and as they are no dissimilar I am sure I would love them. x

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Gerry

marzipan

"Isn't it marzipan made from pistachios?"
Chazza, always thought it was almonds.

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Chazza

fistik / marzipan

Hey Gerry

""Isn't it marzipan made from pistachios?"
Chazza, always thought it was almonds."


I think it gets its green colour from the pistachios.

Just went for a snoop on the net, it was a bit hard to find information for some reason but here's a site that seems to know what it's about, and the definition it gives on page zillion.

http://www.search.com/reference/Turkish_cuisine

Marzipan:
badem ezmesi or fıstık ezmesi (made of ground pistachio) is another common confection in Turkey.

Checking backwards on a translation dictionary, 'ezmesi' = puree or pate, 'badem' = almond and 'fıstık' = pistachio.

http://en.bab.la/dictionary/english-turkish/pistachio.html

Guess we need an expert.

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Lind

fistik

The Greek word for nuts is 'fistika' (phonetic spelling) so I'm sure your fistik is from the same root and is something to do with nuts.

Lind

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Essex Girl

Beyti

I remember going to this restaurant in Istanbul about forty years ago.....they kept bringing course after course.... All the talk about Turkish food prompted me to Google it to see if it was still there. Have just had a look at all the delicious food on their menu.

 
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