Which knife?

Keen to know which brand to buy? Or want to share a great purchase with the rest of us? This is the place to do it...

 
 
 

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Ferguslea

Which knife?

Hi guys,
I hope you can help. I'm sick to death of struggling with the blunt and rather useless knives I have, they make cooking a chore rather than something to enjoy. I have decided to treat myself to a professional chef’s knife, just one as I don’t have very much money. I am prepared to spend up to maybe £110 - £120 maximum. For this I would need to be able to use it for most everyday kitchen chores. I am totally confused by the selection available. What length should I get, should I go for Global or Tojiro, would that be just paying for the brand, is there a cheaper but just as good alternative?

Thank you in anticipation and best regards,
Brian.

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Welshcookie

Knives

Last week, by chance I was browsing a knife catalogue with my butcher. If anybody is an expert in knives it will be a butcher. Why not pick his brains? I guarantee his first suggestion will be to get a good steel and use it frequently.

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Rosemary S

Good knives

If you are considering just one Chef's knife, it would probably have to be an 8" cooks knife, although a small paring knife and a good bread knife are also a Must. I have 3 Shun knives an 8" chef's knife, a Santuku knife and a paring knife. I also have a Minoso knife and I had Global knives in the past which have been passed on to my nephew. I recently came across Robert Welch Signature knives at Lakeland and I got one to try it out (a 6&"188;" chef's knife) and it is a fantastic knife and not as expensive as the ones mentioned above. Lakeland don't do an 8" chef's knife but you can get that from many other sites. If you liked the Robert Welch knives, you could probably get two or three knives for the price of one Shun knife. Whatever knives you do decide to buy, get a proper sharpener to suit the knives at the same time.
Hope this helps

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Linzechris

Which knife?

I was in the same quandry just a little while ago and in the end plumped for the Global G2 as it had a lot of recommendations. However, that may not be right for you as you really need to hold a knife and feel how it is for you. I however did buy it without holding it first and I must say that it is brilliant and slices, chops and carves really well and there are no little crevices for germs to hide. It must NEVER go in the dishwasher and when you can afford it I would recommend as someone else has said that you get a good sharpener because however good a knife, it still needs sharpening from time to time. I bought a minosharp sharpener as they are recommended for Global knives and it has brought my old knives up to being much better than they were.
If you are looking for a knife to cut bread then is is not the knife for you, but I think it cuts most other things.I have been very pleased with mine.
I noticed someone else suggested a Lakeland knife. Mostly stuff from Lakeland is very good and the customer service is excellent, I have never tried their knives but if they are much cheaper they might be worth a go. I would still buy a good sharpener though, you will be amazed at the difference it makes. Hope this helps. Oh and just one other thing, beware of imitation Global knives, it is big business. Nesbits are probably the best value to buy from.x

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Chippychap

Knives

Iowned a fish and chip shop for twenty years.
sharpening the knife I used to cut the fish with used to give me nightmares.
Until you get good at sharpening I would humbly suggest buying a cheaper knife as incorrect sharpening will goose even the most expensive knife. Don't forget it is the knife edge that cuts your food not the label. Surgeons found that chips of larval rock cut better than the finest scalpels.
The sharpener I use with my knives at home is the type with the rollers that sit in a shallow bath of water.
The blade edge sits in the groove of the rollers and is rolled back and forth. My sharpener has two rollers, coarse and fine.
Having one of these whilst at the shop would have saved me many grey hairs and an absolute fortune in knives.
As for steels, they fettle a sharp knife and will not sharpen a blunt edge.
As for butchers, mine sends his knives away to be sharpened.
Ya pays ya money.

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Ferguslea

Well I got one!

Hello all!
Firstly thank you for your recommendations. After much hand wringing and head scratching it was a very close call between the Global G2 and the Tojiro pro DP 21 CM (8inch as recommended by Rosemary s)

There was little to choose between them price wise and both were considerably less than I would have been prepared to pay, had I been convinced it was worth it.

I'm embarrassed to admit that the final choice came down to the look of the thing - lol. I preferred the handles on the Tojiro pro!

I ordered it from Nippon Kitchen online as they had the best price as far as I could see. (£57.99 at the time of writing.)

I took onboard what chippychap said about sharpening the knife and so I also bought the ceramic sharpener for £12.99.

I live in Spain and international shipping was £7.25. The package was well wrapped and arrived in one week from the date of postage.

The knife itself is a good weight and was sharp as a razor straight out of the box, of course within 3 minutes of using it I had cut myself, as well to get it over quickly, it was always going to happen when a clumsy git like me and a sharp implement come together!


Best regards,
Brian.

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Chippychap

Well done

Enjoy the knife.
There isn't a cook worth their salt ANYWHERE who hasn't toasted a decent knife in their own blood.
A lot of knives won't go in the dishwasher AND don't put it into the sink with other pots being washed it just makes for pink washing up water ;-)
Chop chop

 
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