Preserving jars

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boo

Preserving jars

I would like to attempt to make chutney and also pickled onions (never done before)i have been looking on Lakeland do i buy preserving jars or jam jars? I also
read that using metal lids is a no no
with vinegar, advice on what i need
would be appreciated
many thanks
Boo x

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Expat Badger

Preserving jars

most of what we make uses vinegar (i don't make jam, just pickles and chutneys) and we use jars that have metal screw lids but are lined with plastic/rubber type stuff

they are preserving jars (we get them in the supermarket at this time of year) - when you put them im the oven to sterilise the rubbery plastic goes soft so when you screw the lids on you get a good seal...

bernardin is the make - no idea if they are sold outside n america

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boo

Preserving jars

Thanks for the quick reply expat badger, i'm on recouperation at home
so looking at purchasing off the net,
i only want to do pickles and chutneys too, reading all the latest chutney posts has inspired me!
Boo x

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Welshcookie

Preserving

I think jars with wire closures and rubber rings are more versatile because it is easy to get enough jam jars with lids for jam making. I would go for Lakeland ones. By mistake I bought some Kilners in Sainsbury's and the wire closures are useless, sadly; the firm was the watch-word for quality in the past.

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Nausea Bagwash

jars

I tend to use recycled jam jars - they're free and perfectly ok for jam, marmalade, chutneys and pickles. I never through a jar away. In fact I am still using 2 Co-op jam jars that my grandmother used for her jam making! Be careful though, when recycling the lids from "shop" jam as occasionally you can come across one that doesn't have a lining and I can remember a jar of piccalilli which I found in the cupboard with a hole in the lid. The vinegar fumes had corroded it. .

Obviously you need Kilner or Le Parfait preserving jars for bottling.

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Nausea Bagwash

Cmore jars

Welshcookie - the Kilner jars with the clip fasteners are intended only as storage jars and not for preserving (the same applies to the similar ones in ASDA and IKEA). If you want Kilner jars for preserving you need the screw top ones.

The "Le Parfait" clip jars are, of course, designed for preserving and you can get a proper seal

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Welshcookie

Kilner storage jars

Oh yes I realise they are only for storage, but the wire closures are rubbish even if you only want to store vanilla sugar in the jar.

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JamJar aka Chutney Queen

preserving jars

I recycle glass jam/chutney etc. jars for all my preserves. Go into dishwasher and lids wasghed in v.hot water. Be careful with metal lids with no plasticky lining as they can corrode, as has been said. OK for jams but not chutneys. Most lids these days seem to be fine.
I think I worked out that it would be cheaper to buy the v.cheapest supermarket jam you can find, throw contents away and use the jars, than to buy new from Lakeland, I think they are v.expensive.

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Expat Badger

Preserving jars

I used to use the rubber ring jars with metal clips (kilner?) but found the rubber rings corroded...so now just use them for sugar, flour etc

more confident that the screw top ones have a proper seal

they were super cheap in the supermarket - i think we paid 8 or 9 bucks for 12 500ml jars. That's about 5 or 6 quid

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Pattesons

Preserving jars

We make our own homemade preserves and use Pattesons Glass preserving jars, i think the minimum order is 50 or 100 but you get a good price.

We use to use lakeland but buying in bulk we got them a bit cheaper. Hope that helps

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Nausea Bagwash

Green onions

""I would like to attempt to make chutney and also pickled onions (never done before)"

I think you've already had all the input about the jars but if you have never made pickles before do be aware that vinegar comes in different strengths and ordinary table vinegar is nowhere near strong enough for onions, for example. At the right time of year, when the pickling onions are on the shelves in the UK, they sell 'pickling vinegar' which is stronger and sometimes flavoured. My mother always used Sarson's pickling without flavourings, adding her own flavours as required.

Another thing to watch for is the chemical change that takes place in pickled onions. The vinegar, in time (several months) changes some of the chemicals in the onions. I am intolerant to fresh onion but am fine with commercial pickles and home-made older than three months. Onions are a food that change chemical structure according to whether they are cut, boiled, fried, or

And don't panic if your onions acquire a greenish hue when thet are first made. It disappears after a while. I've only seen this happen once but it panicked me! I wrote to Good Housekeeping magazine about it and their cookery person wrote back to say it sometimes happened and looks a bit alarming but it's nothing to worry about

 
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