Frying pans

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sam from worthing

Frying pans

earlier this year my 2 tefal pans gave up the ghost.

one warped immensely, had a very rocky bottom and the other lost its non stick stuff - and not through bad washing up (not by dishwasher as i don;t have one).

I was reading about ceramic frying pans, and how good and healthy they were, ie, the need for very little or no oil, they heated quicker and stayed hot for longer thereby cutting down on cooking time, and a simple wipe with damp sponge or kitchen roll to clean.

so i got suckered in and brought one - a kuhn rikon pan.

well, i have to say its the worst thing i have ever brought - and was quite pricey too (for my budget)... it lasted probably 2 weeks - when i could fry an egg with no oil and the eggs slipped around the pan, i could maky spag bol without sticking, i could do a stir fry with ease.... then it went awry, needing oil, but that burnt... eggs became crusty and crunchy with the yolk being under cooked. bubble and squeak became impossible to make, just a slop. As for cleaning the pan, not even an over night soak would shift the stick - i had to end up using my spontex wire sponge thingy - which used gently but firmly hasn;t scratched - YET....

So, once again i am looking for a good reasonably priced frying pan (or 2) i was thinking 20 cm and 26/28 cm. can anyone recommend some good ones?
Thank you. samxx

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SonyaK

Frying pans

Most of my frying pans and saucepans are Circulon and I love them!!

Good non-stick that lasts for years and not too heavy.
They are fairly expensive, I guess, but I've always got them on sale - usually half price!!
I'd thoroughly recommend them and in previous discussions others have too.

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Noreen, Board Moderator

Frying pans

Sam - look no further than Delia's range!
http://www.deliaonline.com/news-and-features/delia-silverwood.html

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Hetty46

Le Creuset

Hello,
I have recently bought a new small frying pan after my expensive non stick one by Woll became unsightly. I bought a red orange cast iron Le Creuset one not enamelled on the inside, just black. When out of the package I put old oil in and put it in the oven on a low heat as described on the internet. I wash it by hand. I soak it with warm water first.

It is not cheap, but it is worth the investment. I have a larger one by Le Creuset for as long as I can remember. Over the years all non stick pans have had to be thrown out, but the cast iron ones are here to stay. So save up and you won't be sorry. Cast iron will last for generations!

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Janice

Frying pans


"Hello,
I have recently bought a new small frying pan after my expensive non stick one by Woll became unsightly. I bought a red orange cast iron Le Creuset one not enamelled on the inside, just black. When out of the package I put old oil in and put it in the oven on a low heat as described on the internet. I wash it by hand. I soak it with warm water first.

It is not cheap, but it is worth the investment. I have a larger one by Le Creuset for as long as I can remember. Over the years all non stick pans have had to be thrown out, but the cast iron ones are here to stay. So save up and you won't be sorry. Cast iron will last for generations!"



Hetty, I wholeheartedly agree. I was at first reluctant to use cast iron having been so used to non-stick cookware, but after using it a few times and getting used to it, I wished I had never wasted so much money on countless non-stick pans that ended up either in the bin, the garage or under plants. Food definitely tastes better and chicken is delicious fried in one. I have been using mine for many years now - the same ones which never wear out. I would never recommend anything but cast iron.

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Hetty46

Cast iron

Delia, in her video on frying pans shows her cast iron one which she has used for many years and says she will do a video on cast iron too. The aluminium pans will be a cheaper alternative, better and longer lasting than non-stick coated ones, but cast iron is the top.

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NateJ

Lodge cast iron

For those of you who might not want enameled cast iron, I don't know what is available in Britain that is made locally.

However, the American company, Lodge, sells some really reasonably priced, USA made, un-enameled cast iron. (Their enameled stuff is China made so I buy Le Creuset even though the price is shocking).

Not everything on amazon can be shipped internationally but a quick search showed me this:

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LCC3-Logic-Pre-Seasoned-Cooker/dp/B0009JKG9M/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1391560745&sr=8-3&keywords=lodge+cast+iron+skillet

It's a bit over 21 pounds, is a 3 quart dutch oven/deep skillet + a lid that doubles as a 10.25/26cm shallow skillet and can be used under the grill, in the oven, and on the stove top.

(I have several skillets made by this company but am also buying a Mermaid little gem, it's on its way to me)

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Janina

Induction pans?

I have just had an induction hob installed. I can't use Delia's aluminium pan on it and I don't want cast iron. Any suggestions please?

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SonyaK

Frying pans

Many (most?) stainless steel pans sold now are suitable for induction hobs. It usually states this on the packaging when you buy them.

I use Circulon pans which I really like, but if you don't want non-stick there are plenty of others.

Take a small magnet with you to the shops and test to see if it sticks to the base of the pan.
Also test any other pans you already have - they may work as well!

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AOL Cookshop

Non-stick frying pans

Hello everyone, I have been running a cookshop for 25 years and the ONE thing that very few people realise is that non-stick should NOT be over heated. Over heating is the ONE main reason for pans to start sticking. Most people know that we shouldn't cut into non-stick, which was really necessary with cheaper non-stick (like on some bakeware)who would peel off is cut. These days most non-stick used for frying pan will not peel off as such, but will degrade under too much heat. First, avoid heating up the pan without fat in it, just in case you overheat it, at least most of the heat can go into the fat/oil. A good way to know how much heat you're putting your pan through is that if the oil you put in it is starting to fume then it is too much strain on the non-stick. So when you want to sear something, use Delia's frying pan, or if you have induction, you can either use Le Creuset Cast Iron (they are NOT with a non-stick coating anymore)or Demeyere. I recommend to have 1 pan with a coating and 1 without. Other elements to take in consideration for using your "non-stick" pan efficiently is the heat conductivity of the metal used for the body of the pan, but this will be another post(if there is interest). Feel free to ask me for more, as I did not want to swamp with too much to begin with

 
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