Washed away veg patch

We know many of you are keen on gardening, so here's your latest plot: dug over, weed free and ready to sow the seeds of new ideas...

 
 
 

Page :  1
avatar
Sue G

Washed away veg patch

After three weeks and it looks like another week of rain due, my veg patch has washed away.

The kids and i planted Green beans/sugar peas/carrots/ beetroot and a few other seed. We waited and watched the neighbour plant their seed and did the same.

Yesterday the veg patch which is quite big was just a huge puddle of rain water.
No sign of seeds or seedling.

Only the potatoes/onions are still in the ground, my son planted radish seeds in window boxes and luckily we hadn't moved them onto the plot so they are still happy.

How's your garden?????

avatar
Gerry

washout

Poor you. Pity the weeds don't get washed away.

avatar
Sue G

Hi gerry

"Poor you. Pity the weeds don't get washed away."

Hi gerry,

Yes it is a pity about weeds also nettles.
Due to 2 old dogs 5 hens 3 coq and a new puppy we can't put down stuff stronger enough to kill the nettles which are growing out of control on one side of the garden which also borders on next doors field.
This belongs to the circus and he put some of the animals in here. So have to be really careful what we put in the garden.

Maybe i should go for the wildlife look and let nature take over.

avatar
Gerry

SueG's nettles

Pick the young tops (rubber gloves) and use in cooking. Boiling water kills the sting.

avatar
sam from worthing

Washed away veggies

I so empathise, i can so imagine your heart ache. i haven;t gotten round to "making our veg patch" yet as since we finished un packing the inside of new house and have been able to start the garden - the heavens opened up.

but our grass has standing water on it - and ever step you make you squelch lol.

I think any seeds you have planted will undoubtably be washed away - if young plants they should recover themselves (dig in some sharp sand - that will held drainage and help young plants roots grab onto soemthing, and as you mention you have a large plot - either side of your veg rows build up a trench wall, then when we have dry weather any watering that you do - will hold in the trench to feed the plant roots.

with your nettles - are they in a really grassy area? if they are - put on your jeans and welly boots an old long sleeved shirt (borrowed from your dad - like in school for art classes lol) and gloves - and stomp around on the nettles - and as close the ground as you can - then strim or mow that area (do it before the nettles go to seed) do not compost nettles though. nettles have a really long and complex root system like bind weed and ivy - if possible once you have stomped and killed off the nettles for stinging purposes dig around where its growing from and you will find long white ish hairy roots, some will be big some will be like thick hair - try and gently tease the root up and along as far as you can go to get as much up as possible - its a bit labour intensive - but you will clear the nettles, it may take 2-3 seasons it did for me in our old house.

If the nettles are growing in an area that has concrete or crazy paving or horrid manky ground - i would suggest getting a "flame thrower" weed killer - if you image the blow torches we use for creme brulees etc - its on a long metal stick like a walking stick - with a flame - then it has a lever on the handle that you can "flame"
the weed and its root - good for dandelions too - but i wouldn;t suggest use the flame thrower if you have grass surrounding the nettles. You can get from amazon. and i think if memory serves me well - every now and again i think lidl have them in stock - you know the different bargains they have that change on a weekly basis (could be aldi - its one of the 2 stores).

avatar
Sue G

Sam

Thanks Sam will give a go, might takes ages, there must be at least 10 meters of fencing on the front garden which is where most of them are growing.

Underneather one of our trees there were a few starting to grow and i did put the blow torch on them. Will look out for a flame thrower (sp) in Lidl for one going cheap, in the garden centre over here the cheapest i have seen is 80.00 euros.
will get my sister to keep a look out over in the UK for cheap ones.

Off to run the puppy around the garden, she's been asleep all afternoon in front of the woodburner.

avatar
Yummy

Nettles

Hi Sue, wow your family is growing by the day !!!

Ref the nettles, with the soggy ground they will be easy to pull up, it will take a while but keep at them and overtime they will diminish and give up, then take them to the decetterie and dump them onto them. Just make sure you get some good letter/suede type gloves so the stings don't get at you !!!

Same with the ferns, we had loads and loads of them down the side of our house down by the farmers lane when we moved and by doing as I suggested they are giving up the ghost. OK we still get the odd ones popping up but they too are easy to pull.
Hopefully this way you will keep your need for Desherbents to a minimum. Bon Chance x

avatar
Yummy

Nettles

Sue, I meant to add, look out for ragwort in you field where Chico is, tall with yellow daisy like flowers, NOT GOOD for horse, ponies and donkeys as they will cause dreadful problems.

http://www.horsetrust.org.uk/pdfs/no7ragwort.pdf

This is a link which will explain the problems.

yummy x

avatar
Darkginger

Nettles

I managed to keep ours under control last year by cutting them back early in the season - using a pair of scissors (and wearing rubber gloves)! I found the motivation for this by using them to make nettle beer - it's very easy and well worth the effort involved. If you Google 'two more nettle beer recipes' you should find the recipe for 'Stronger Nettle Beer' which is the one I used (it takes 10 carrier bags full of nettles to make) - and I can vouch for the results - very nice as a chilled drink in the summer!

avatar
Sue G

Nettles

Thanks for the nettle advice, will try removing some this week and next as we have bank holidays and hubby should be home.(will get him to test out the gloves)

Thanks Yummy for the advice about Chico, unfortunately we had to let him go to another home. I was so sad, but he was to dangerous for the kids. The first few days we had him he was fine and let the kids get quite close to him, then he turned nasty with the kids & hubby, as soon as they went into the garden even just to feed the chicks he would corner them and rear up, once my daughter tripped over and he nearly landed on her. We banned the kids from the rear garden and only i would feed the chicks, then he started to escape into the front garden and it became to dangerous for them. So he went to a new home, just with other donkeys, we spoke to the vet and he said even if we had him 'done' we can't be sure he would calm down.

avatar
Dottie May

Washed Away Veg Patch

Sue G - so sorry to hear your veg patch has been washed away. All that hard work etc. We've had loads of rain here in Wales but our garden is looking good but don't have a veg patch. The grass is looking lovely and green but will need a mow soon if the rain stops. What a pity that Chico has been naughty and you had to rehome him. I expect the children were sad but you couldn't keep him if he was dangerous.

 
Page :  1

Return to Homepage
Visit the Delia Online Cookery School with Waitrose
Click here to go to Waitrose.com

 

 




NetObserver
CMS solutions by REDtechnology.com