Whats a good all round red wine to cook with?

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Ferguslea

Whats a good all round red wine to cook with?

Hi guys,
In an ideal world I would have an unlimited budget and a huge well stocked wine cellar.

In the real world I have a very modest income and a passion for good food.

I would love to be able to stock a selection of wines which compliment perfectly each dish I want to make but cant, so....

Can any one recommend a good red which would be acceptable in a host of different dishes? (Or perhaps I could stretch to 2)

Best regards,

Brian

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Janice

Good all round red wine

Don't know where you are located Brian, so may not be of much help. Here in the USA I spend a whopping $3 or approx 2 pounds sterling for Oak Leaf wine, which comes in red, white and rose and is fantastic both as a wine to drink and to cook with. I am a red wine drinker and find that the red is amazingly good for such a low price and you will probably say I can't have a very discerning palate, but I have!! Whilst back in Sussex for the summer this year I was spending 8 - 15 pounds for a bottle of red and never did find one that tasted as good as Oak Leaf. I love food cooked in wine and don't forget sherry or marsala works great too.
Good hunting.
Janice

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Linzechris

cooking wine

Hi, when cooking, if you do not want to use an expensive wine then a make called J P Chenet is good.
I have often used it and the dish I am cooking always turns out nice. They also do it in a box so if you use it a lot for cooking then this is a good way to buy it as you can use as much or as little as you like without it going off.
It is sold in most supermarkets and def in Tesco. Hope this helps.

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Welshcookie

Wine for cooking

Only use a wine for cooking that you are happy to drink.

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Expat Badger

cooking wine

yes i just slosh in whatever i have open - and if i have nothing in then vermouth instead of white and watered down port instead of red

that doesn't usually happen tho - there's usually a bottle of red on the go!

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Ferguslea

Any ole wine!

lol - that will give me PLENTY of scope then!!!

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Guacamole

cooking wine

Welshcookie, afraid I disagree, wine changes dramatically when cooked/reduced and combined with other ingredients...seasoning can be altered, salt, pepper, even a pinch of sugar or a drop of vinegar just as you would do with tomatoes that aren't always top quality eaten raw, but fantastic in a sauce.
Not sure you would tell the difference in a Boeuf Bourginonne with lovely other ingredients, or a syrupy reduced red wine sauce, though perhaps you should be more careful with a delicately poach pear...

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Welshcookie

Wine for cooking

Ah well, it all depends. I don't see the point of buying a rot-gut wine for cooking and not wanting to have a slurrrrrrrrp too.

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Gravy Queen

Good all round red wine

I agree with Welshcookie - I would only cook with something I will happily drink too. Lets face it there are loads of decent wines in the supermarkets now and they are cheap as chips. You can easily find a good one. Depends what I am cooking sometimes as to which one I will choose, I tend to go for a nice french wine for my boof bourgignon and a nice soft italian for the likes of Delia's ragu. Otherwise I go with what I have in, and they are all drinkable !

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JAMES

Cooking Wine.

I also agree with the "if you would not drink it, don't cook with it" rule.

As Welshcookie says, if Im using wine in my cooking, I want a glass of it to help me on my way too!!!!

You do not have to spend a fortune but I will not buy a poor wine just to cook with. I'd rarely use an entire bottle in cooking, so, as I say, Im gonna be drinking the rest.......

x

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JaneMR

Whats a good all round red wine to cook with

As my husband will not let me near HIS cellar, I tend to buy a Merlot to cook with. It does not need to be an expensive one, but I have found that the flavour for stews, gravies and so on is well rounded without too much tannin.

 
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