Fish Sauce

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Tompeters

Fish Sauce

I've just been introduced to Fish Sauce as used in Thai cookery....in my case it was suggested to add to savoury mince and was really delicious. Not in the least bit fishy or anythingy, come to that, just gave the dish a sparkle. One tablespoon in 1kg mince.

Can anyone suggest other uses in traditional British and European dishes, other than Eastern cuisine?

Many thanks.

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Darkginger

Fish sauce

Try adding a few drops to scrambled eggs - you don't taste the fish sauce, but it enhances the eggs.I

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Tompeters

Fish Sauce

Thanks, DG, I can imagine that and will try next time. Now we have three hens we are getting a bit of a glut with just the two of us!

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Honey

Fish Sauce

This is going to sound really a bit odd, but it seems to work for us. I put a dash of fish sauce in my Cod and Prawn curry. That really is mixing the cuisine. I know that's not British... but by all accounts it's been adopted here. I'm still amazed when I hear that curry is our favourite takeaway now. I do like curry, but you can't beat British Fish and Chips. Having said that... the Chinese chips are usually so much better than ours (less soggy). Sorry, I'm waffling.

H x

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Tompeters

Fish Sauce

Thanks Honey,sounds good. The kids (and us!) like egg 'n salad cream sarnies......maybe a tsp added?

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Yummy

Fish Sauce

I'm a bit surprised you are surprised TP, after all you might add Anchovies to Mince and Lamb dishes....just the same really, As for eggs, not sure about that personally, never like eggs from hens that have been fed on fishy stuff .

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Tompeters

Fish Sauce

Not really, Yummy. I have always added a good dash of L&P but Fish Sauce was new to me. It seems it's made from anchovies but is a very different thing to L&P. The Fish Sauce is a source of umami, as is glutamate. I've been adding one tbs Fish Sauce and a good tsp of Aromat (essentially salt and MSG) to one kg of meat, which seems to be good for our tastes, and our grandchildrens'. From the wiki:

Umami has a mild but lasting aftertaste difficult to describe. It induces salivation and a sensation of furriness on the tongue, stimulating the throat, the roof and the back of the mouth.[19][20] By itself, umami is not palatable, but it makes a great variety of foods pleasant especially in the presence of a matching aroma.[21] But like other basic tastes, with the exception of sucrose, umami is pleasant only within a relatively narrow concentration range.[19] The optimum umami taste depends also on the amount of salt, and at the same time, low-salt foods can maintain a satisfactory taste with the appropriate amount of umami.[22] In fact, Roininen et al. showed that ratings on pleasantness, taste intensity and ideal saltiness of low-salt soups were greater when the soup contained umami, whereas low-salt soups without umami were less pleasant.[23] Some population groups, such as the elderly, may benefit from umami taste because their taste and smell sensitivity is impaired by age and medicine. The loss of taste and smell can contribute to poor nutrition, increasing their risk of disease.[24]

 
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