Butter

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Florry

Butter

What difference would it make to my baking if I used Lurpak 'Lighter?'

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Tompeters

Butter

Have a look at the fat percentage. To be precise, you should compensate for the fat content. e.g. Trex is 100% fat butter is 80% fat, Trex recommend that you use 20% less Trex and make up the water if you are substituting Trex for butter. I don't have a pack of the Lurpak lighter so don't know the %.

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JAMES

Butter.


"What difference would it make to my baking if I used Lurpak 'Lighter?'"


The only real difference is that the oil added to the butter will give you a more moist result. Have a look at the "fats"
video in the cookery school on here.

If it say 100g of butter you are fine to use the same for a spreadable butter instead, no need to start figuring out water content etc. Pointless.

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Tompeters

Not so

James, 'spreadable' butter is generally butter with a little veg oil and has around the same fat content as butter (80% is the legal minimum level). Delia is specifying 'spreadable' in her first vid, for sponge cake. 'Spreadable' is for most purposes identical to butter but is softer from the fridge - and Delia explains that's why she recommends it for the sponge. Obviously we can carry on with butter....but let it soften.

The 'lighter' variants are invariably lower in fat - they emulsify water into the product. It's fat that is needed in a recipe to get the desired effect.

Have a look at lurpak.co.uk You'll see that the 'lightest' product is only 40% fat -- it's really water emulsified into fat to make an agreeable spread, not something intended to cook with. The 'lighter' product (the subject of this thread) is only 60% fat. You certainly wouldn't want to sautee in 'lighter' or 'lightest' as you'd have to let all that water boil off. Well, you wouldn't use it unless you had nothing else -- I'd not even try to sautee with it.

Fat content is vital to pastry, cakes and most of our UK bread.

Or maybe you have actually tried it yourself and can report the the results were good without making any adjustment?

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JAMES

Butter.

I have indeed used the "lighter" one in sponge, pastry and a lot in bread with no problems at all.

I've never used the "lightest" one though.

I do tend to use normal butter mainly and I'm not on a diet, but I've used "lighter"
when that's all we've had in the fridge.

People really do over analyse.

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Tompeters

Butter

I refer you to Delia's vid of techniques "weighing and measuring" Attention to detail and accuracy is the hallmark of a good consistent cook. My gran did everything as 'slugs of this and handfuls of that'. Mostly it was alright but you never knew whether you were going to get 'coq au vin' or 'vin au coq'. In professional kitchens precision is the rule I understand other than a final adjustment to flavour and consistency. It was always fun wondering what we'd get :)

 
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