greasy or sticky sponge cakes

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sheilad

greasy or sticky sponge cakes

I've been cooking sponge cakes for years and they used to be ok. However, in the last couple of years, they rise well and look good when they first come out of the oven but within a day they appear sticky and moist on top. If I put icing sugar on top, that then gets soaked up. I have tried using butter, stork etc but nothing seems to help. Its got to the stage that I can't make any sort of sponge cake unless it is only going to be eaten by the family! (I usually cook it on the fan oven setting.)
On a similar note, if I do a special cake, all be it sponge or fruit and want to put roll out fonadant icing on it, even though I use a very thin layer of apricot jam, again, the icing becomes almost slimy, within a day or two and makes the cake underneath too moist and definietly shortens the life of the cake.(with fruit cake like Xmas cake, I have to use fondant icing instead of marzipan and then put a thin layer of royal icing on top as I have a child with a nut allergy.)

Any ideas? It is getting so frustrating!

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Sticky sponge cakes

Are you storing them in an air tight tin? Is your storage area humid or damp at any time? This sounds more like a storage than a baking issue to me.

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sheilad

greasy or sticky sponge cakes

Thank you for your thoughts. the only thing is that I do have air tight tins and it doesn't matter what time of the year I bake. Also, with the celebration cakes, they are usually so big that they don't get put in a tin, just covered with foil. So I think it is something to do with the fat content but don't know what as I have tried stork, butter etc. All i can say is that the tops go sticky/wet within a day but the house is not damp. Just a thought - the tins I use to store them in are metal ones but I can't think that this would make a difference. Any further thoughts appreciated.

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sticky cakes

Out of interest I googled the problem. Some of the answers:


There are many possible reasons that your cake absorbs moisture while cooling, this is a common problem.

The first thing that comes to mind for me is the amount of sugar in a formula. Sugar is highly hydroscopic, meaning it will absorb moisture. Cakes high in sugar ratio will actually take on moisture while cooling. You can reduce the amount of sugar, or increase flour and egg slightly to lessen this effect.

Be sure to let all cakes cool in the pan for the first 15 minutes or so to retain structure. Then, they should be cooled INVERTED on a wire rack. The bottom of the cake won't take on as much moisture as the top crust will.

Don't ever wrap a cake in plastic wrap. It will steam, giving soggy crust. Even after it's cool, don't wrap it or place in plastic containers. You're better off letting the cake dry for a day and then "punching" it with a sugar syrup to replace moisture than trying to ice a soggy cake.

Finally, most cakes are trimmed to get a nice flat top for icing. The wet cake top you have is no problem, since you'll be slicing it away in the end.
.........

Primarily, it sounds as though your cooling rack is too close to the surface. Raise it up about 4 to 6 inches. Place your cooling rack on evenly sized items such as a 1"
can of vegetables

avatar
K9 Springer

Sticky sponge cakes

I was looking for a solution to this problem and read the last response with interest. I also conducted a little experiment.
I baked a batch of 4 muffins. When I was sure they had completely cooled (4 hours) I left 2 exposed to the air overnight and put 2 in an airtight metal tin. In the morning the 2 in the tin had wet looking sticky tops. The 2 left out were okay. I put one of the okay ones in a cardboard box in the fridge and one in a plastic airtight box. Within a couple of hours the one in the plastic box was wet and sticky. The one in the box in the fridge had such a tiny bit of sticky it was irrelevant.
I think the problem is storage in airtight tins. But this is how we are always told to store cakes.
I have also found that if a cake is to be iced/buttercreamed then it should be done as soon as the cake is cooled, that also stops the stickiness.

 
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