Large victoria sponge cakes

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foodoflove

Large victoria sponge cakes

Hi - I'm having a repeated problem with baking large victoria sponge cakes using Delia's 'all-in-one' method.

The cakes are fine in a 8 inch round tin, but when I try a much larger deeper 10 inch square tin I get heavy sponge cakes, despite the skewer coming out completely clean.

Here's what I'm doing:

Preparing the ingredients exactly as delia says, including making sure butter and eggs are at a warm room temperature. Using my kenwood chef K beater to mix all ingredients together (including the sifted self raising flour, golden caster sugar, vanilla essence and the extra teaspoon of baking powder). I mix for normally around 10 minutes until I have a dropping consistency and it is silky and smooth.

I then bake the mixture for around an hour and a half - and normally for about 10-15 minutes extra from when the skewer comes out clean. I use a new fan oven and start at 160 C for 20 mins then lower to 150 C.

The cake looks risen and bronze in colour, but when it has cooled on the rack it is doughy inside.

Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong please? I worry that if I bake it for longer the crusts will get too dry - they already were a bit dry last time, despite the inside being doughy.

Perhaps the 'allinone' method is not suitable when baking large sponge cakes?

Appreciate your thoughts :-)

Thanks

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May Parker

Problem sponge

"Hi
My first thought is that you should be making two sponges rather than one, ie two loose-bottomed cake tins.
On Monday I made what I think could be considered a 'large' victoria sponge and this is what I did:
I used 2 8" greased tins - bottoms also lined with greased circles of greaseproof paper. (Heat oven to 180 (350 or Mark 4).
I used 6oz butter and allowed my little Breville Platinum Pro auto-mixer to beat this while I measured out 6oz caster sugar which I then added to the now very soft butter; then I let the beaters do their work for about five minutes or so; I then broke 3 eggs into a bowl and in another bowl I sifted 6oz self-raising flour. When the mix looked lighter in colour and creamy I whisked up the eggs and whilst the mixer was still running I slowly poured in the eggs, taking a small spoon of flour to ensure the mix didn't curdle. When all the egg was mixed well (and don't forget the eggs were already whisked so this didn't take long), I took the bowl from the machine and added the flour which I folded into the creamy mixture. Having divided into the two tins I baked mid-oven for 25 minutes - I checked for 'springiness' and decided another couple of minutes was needed. The cakes were golden and just coming away from the sides of the tins when they were baked. Cooled, spread with Little Scarlet Strawberry Jam, the top spread with a little quickly made-up icing and sprinkled with flaked chocolate - delicious and melt-in-the mouth sponge below a golden soft crust, and about 5" in depth, which I think is large enough for any sponge cake.
Hope that helps you to achieve a larger sponge.
MP"

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foodoflove

large victoria sponge cakes problem

Hi May

Thanks very much, but my problem is slightly different. I use the sponge for celebration cakes, therefore I need to cut off the crusts and have a decent depth of sponge cake to be able to slice with a cake cutter and then layer up normally a depth of 3 sponge layers sandwiched typically with jam and buttercream.

So I'm trying to get a moist, light, but also large and deep sponge cake - hence in this case baking shallower sponges in separate tins won't work.

I do use a loose bottomed tin anyway, even if it is very large (ideally I'd like to use my 12 inch square tin but i'm having problems with my 10 inch square tin as it is).

Thanks anyway appreciate your help.

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May Parker

Deep Sponge Cake

Hi and thanks for your message. I understand now why you need a deeper sponge and I'm going to have a go with my 10" tin this weekend just to see how it turns out - will let you know!
May

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foodoflove

thanks

Thanks May, look forward to hearing how you get on. In the meantime I will experiment with creaming the butter and sugar first and not using the all in one method :-)

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Rita

it should work

foodoflove
I do not understand why you cannot cook 2 shallower sponges.
I do a lot of celebration cakes and wedding cakes and I bake any sponge larger than 8" in 2 shallower caketins.

Yes you do get a crust, but I remove the crust and put one cake on top of the other. I usually cut the 2 sponges in half and so I fill the layers with buttercream, jam, buttercream.

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May Parker

Problem sponge...

Well, I had a go at baking a larger sponge (the same method as before) and it turned out to be exactly as it should - a slight crust and a light and delicious centre - although, because I increased volume but baked it in a 10" tin, it turned out only one-and-a-half inches deep.
My recipe was one which Mum and I put together many years ago (hand-written in her 1957 cookbook which I still have!). We simply increased our ingredients for a large chocolate/lemon sponge: 8oz butter, 8oz sugar, 4 eggs, 10oz SR flour, 1 tsp b/powder and grated rind of lemon for one half, 1oz cocoa for the other. I baked it at 180 and took it out of the oven after 40mins having placed a piece of g/greaseproof paper on top and turned heat to 150 after 30mins. The original was covered in a simple lemon icing with chocolate flakes sprinkled over. But, I realised it still wasn't deep enough. I reckon twice the volume in that tin and care on not allowing it to brown too much should work, probably turning the heat down slightly and taking an hour to bake. I'm going to give it another try this week!
May

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foodoflove

sponge

Hi - thanks for trying and glad you got yours to work.

I've managed to sort it now by using the creaming method - this has produced perfect deep sponges in both 10 inch and 12 inch square tins. I'm not going to use the all in one method any more, except for small tins and cup cakes.

Thanks very much :-)

Happy baking

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May Parker

Sponge

So glad you've sorted the problem. I have to say (and this could be the 'old-fashioned' me speaking), I always beat the butter, add the sugar and cream to a light mix before adding whisked eggs - I think this method is the best ever for a light and airy sponge.
Happy Baking.
May

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poodle123

mixing time

I think you are probably mixing too long. I mix with a kenwood k beater on high for about 30 secs... 1 mix max.

always light and fluffy.

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Aline.D

Large sponge!

I am so comforted foodoflove, by the idea that im not alone. The expense! of lost ingredients and the tears that follow. I also tried the all in one method and oddly enough its the first time ive done that. Uneaven, sloppy in the middle and burned on the edges.
So pleased that you found the solution. I will return to my creamed method and give it another shot with renewed vigour.

Happy baking

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Ztcakes

Recipe

Hi I read your messages about large sponge cake for a 10 and 12 inch square cake tin.
I'm having the same problem I can not seem to make it light and fluffy and moist, it always becomes quite a dense cake.
If you don't mind can you help me and pass on the recipe and method please please!

Thank you

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Thistledo

Large Victoria sponge cake

May I also suggest that using a fan-assisted oven is not the best idea for baking such a light cake. The air blasting around the oven will not help in allowing the cake to rise as it should. I've used both fan-assisted and conventional with the identical recipe and there's no question that conventional is best.

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Welshcookie

Large sponge

Madeira cake is usually recommended for larger cakes, I think.

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Country Baker

all in one sponge

Hope I'm not too late with my reply.

I've always understood that it is not necessary to over-beat an all-in-one sponge as it contains baking powder and that does all the raising work for you. Over-beating can cause the cake to sink and become far too dense. I beat my all in one sponges for no more than 30 seconds. But for the traditional method, you need to cream butter and sugar for approx 5 minutes before adding eggs and flour. Hope that helps.

 
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