individual pork pies

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bill Watters

individual pork pies

I am trying to establish a money making side-line making pork pies for my local pub, friends and others. I presently use short-crust pastry in conjunction with a 12 X non-stick muffin tin. I would like to explore the world of hot water pastry incorporating curried meats and would appreciate any expert advice regarding shaping and making the pies. Up to now I have tried wrapping the pastry around jam pots, tying a collar of baking paper around the partly formed pie and securing it with string. Unfortunately my blood pressure soars to dangerous levels when I attempt to extract the glass jar. What do professioonal bakers use and is it feasable to acquire the right kit?

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Gerry

pork pies for Bill

You need Yummy's advice, she is brilliant at that hand-shaping. I've given up on it. Having tried standard way of doing Hot Water Pastry for raised pork and game pies, I now do a method used by Hugh F-W and Metfield Bakery, in which the pastry is left to get cold. This is much easier on the nerves. I do use spring-form tins, easy to remove pies for final egg-glazing of the sides to be finished off in the oven.

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bill Watters

impressive response!

Thanks for the advice. I am amazed at the speed of response. I note your reference to HFW and the Meyfield bakery. oes this occur in one of his books - sadly of all the cookery books I possess I have neglected to include him. However, I shall Google the names and see what they come up with. have a springform tin but it's too large for individual pies and I am aware of pork pie moulds which again are too large for my purpose. THanks again. Cheers Bill

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Gerry

Bill's pies

Metfield Bakery - it's metfieldbakery.com - sells wooden shapes for the purpose, though its online shop is down now but the site was OK. If you go to them they give the recipes for their pork pies and their hot water pastry. Hugh's is different in that it includes eggs. I'll type his recipe up in a little while. BTW Melton Mowbray pork pie company has day course in which you learn how to do it. Maybe Metfield does too.
Jellied stock can be made using pork skin instead of the trotters.

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Gerry

Hugh's raised HWP

100g lard
100g butter, both diced
200ml water
550g plain flour
1&"189; tsp salt
2 medium eggs, beaten
1 egg to glaze
Melt lard and butter, don't boil
Put flour and salt in bowl, make dip in centre and add eggs, mix with knife.
Pour in melted mixture and knead gently but well. Chill for 1 hour, wrapped in clingfilm.
Bill, I've used this but having all lard (home rendered from organic pork), and all water. Ie no milk or butter. It was easy to work and results were great.
Where do you live?

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Yummy

Pork Pies

"I am trying to establish a money making side-line making pork pies for my local pub, friends and others. "
Hi Bill, I wouldn't call myself an expert (Thank you for the accolade Gerry) but I do enjoy making Pork Pies and use Hot water crust pastry which is a lot more maleable than shortcrust, There is a recipe for this on my profile if you would like to have a look.
I bought a Silverwood 1lb Pork Pie mould and it works really well but I only use it when making pies for gatherings as it is a little too big for the two of us. However I have found that by moulding the pastry round the outside of a greased ramekin dish (approx 3in base) and cook for 10 mins upside down then 10 mins turned pastry side down the ramekins are easily removed for the last bit of baking which allows the ramekin to be taken out and filled easily this also give you a nice size pie for individual eating .
I hope this helps, have a look also at the Picasa web album on my profile this shows a few of the pies I have made and lots of other photos of recipes which have been sent to me by members of Delia.
Sorry it's a bit long winded.
Yummy

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Gerry

Yummy's pork pies

"However I have found that by moulding the pastry round the outside of a greased ramekin dish (approx 3in base) and cook for 10 mins upside down then 10 mins turned pastry side down the ramekins are easily removed for the last bit of baking which allows the ramekin to be taken out and filled easily this also give you a nice size pie for individual eating ."
Great tip, Yummy; might try again.

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bill Watters

Great Pie help

My thanks to Gerry and Yummy. From your advice it looks as though tomorrow will be spent in the kitchen! I'll take a look at the wooden moulds. I am somewhat surprised that living as I do in Macclesfield that there isn't a 'up north' pie making centre. We do have an indoor market featuring Spearings pork pies but I know they are machine made. I like the ramekin idea and will begin the day with those. Although time is not a problem - I am retired but now sadly unable to afford taking up cooking courses. Many thanks to all - I'm really impressed with Delia's forum. Kind regards
Bill

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Yummy

Glad to help Bill

Please let us know how you get on....there really isn't any need for expensive classes, we all help one another on here.
Good Luck
Yummy :0)

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John S.

individual pork pies

I have been making pork pies for many many years, always use hot water pastry and have used loose bottom tins for one and three pound pies, raised the crust round a jar and also raised the crust around the meat filling.
Forming the crust around a jar is made much easier if you first cover the bottom of the jar that you are going to use as your form with clingfilm, the crust comes off the jar easy and all you have to do is pull the clingfilm out of the pastry shell.
To make small individual pies the best way I have found is to form your filling into the size you want, an easy way is to use an empty tin with both ends removed, sit the tin on a small piece of G.P. paper and put in the meat to the depth you want and then slide the tin off the meat, make the amount you need the pop them in the freezer and leave them till they are firm on the outside, in the meantime make your pastry up and roll out discs of pastry large enough to form round the bottom and sides of the formed meat leaving enough extra on the sides to be able to crimp the lid in place.
When the meat is firm, one at a time sit a plug of meat in the centre of a disc of pastry and raise the pastry up to enclose the sides, put a lid on and crimp the joint the sit it on a baking sheet, carry on with the rest then bake.

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bill Watters

Different direction

Thanks John S,
I like your idea - it's thinking outside the box - so to speak.
Your method would certainly seem to have advantages over trying to stuff a quantity of meat into pastry bases. Would you cook the pies as normal with the slug of meat at the same temperature as the pastry or even freeze the entire pie and cook from frozen?
When I have completed Yummy's instructions I'll give it a whirl. Many thanks. Cheers Bill

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John S.

individual pork pies

Bill, you don't freeze the meat solid, just long enough to get a hard shell on the outside, hard enough to take the pressure of you forming the pastry around it whilst holding its shape, once the pastry is on the meat it doesn't take long for the meat to thaw then you just bake as usual. I have frozen them solid in the past and kept them for future use but in that case I form the pastry around the meat then let them sit til the meat thawed before baking. I like the look of a hand raised pie with its barrel shaped sides.

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John S.

individual pork pies

The most important thing with using hot water crust esp. on larger pies is to ensure there are no cracks in your pastry case otherwise you lose all your juices and have one hell of a mess in your oven to deal with.

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Yummy

I agree JohnS

It is a fine line we tread, and just a small fissure will allow the juices to escape from said pie.

Good Luck Bill, hope you get the delicous pies you want.
Yummy

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pester

pester

hi - just been looking for tips about making individual pork pies without the pastry either sticking to a mould or falling apart without one! interested in the part baking around the mould first but wondered how the raw pastry lids attach to the cooked pastry sides? does it work? can you let me know. that would be great. thanks. pester

 
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