Fondant or royal icing for Christmas cake?

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kah22

Fondant or royal icing for Christmas cake?

I've just marzipaned the cake and hope to ice it on Monday or Tuesday.

However, as I've mentioned in previous posts, I'm a novice I'm not to sure what type or icing should I opt for Royal or Fondant.

Royal seems to be the traditional yet fondant seems to be quite popular and easier.

What do you think and why?

As always many thanks for your replies.

Kevin

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Welshcookie

Icing

Now this is only my personal opinion but I don't like the taste of either commercial marzipan or fondant.

For speed I have bought fondant in the past, but I much, much prefer Royal icing.

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Lizzie Lancashire

Royal for me...

It really depends on what effect you're after - fondant is easier to work with, and you get a smoother, more professional finish, unless you're a whizz at flat icing with Royal icing (which I'm not!). However, I agree with Welsh Cookie that the flavour of Royal Icing is infinitely superior - I always find fondant icing very sweet and sickly. I also quite like the "snowscene" effect of rough icing with Royal icing.

Good luck with whichever you choose!

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Queen of Puds

Icing

I did an icing & decorating class many years ago, where we learned how to make & handle royal icing & I came to really enjoy the various layers & the sanding down in between. We also learned how to make fondant icing & model flowers etc- all still quite innovative at the time. In reality though, I don't like icing at all, & find it all too sweet, but for ease & speed, I would go for fondant these days, unless you want a rough snow scene which you can do quite quickly with royal icing once you have the right consistency. Flat royal icing can be a complete nightmare unless you are very experienced or a natural! Fondant is more forgiving & a nice broad ribbon in your Christmas themed colours can look festive too.

This year we are having a break with tradition & having our Delia creole cake with just the marzipan & decorated with glace fruits. Suits me!

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kah22

Went For Shop Bought

I decided that I wanted to made a decent presentation and that I'd be challenged with either making my own fondant or royal icing and fitting it on etc, etc, so in the end I opted for Dr.Oetker ready rolled royal icing.

Anybody using ready made?

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Queen of Puds

Fondant

Ready made is very good actually, and it comes in so many jewel bright colours - if you have a specialist cake shop nearby they can be an Aladdin's cave. The best way to get a smooth surface is to polish it with a little cornflour, ideally with an icing smoother, but a dry palm, & a gentle hand will do the job if you're careful & remove any rings first. When you put the icing on, let the warmth of your hands ease the icing over the edges. That way you can avoid cracks - but if it does, you can are fully 'polish' it back together with a finger - seriously!

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Queen of Puds

Fondant

Typo!! - I meant 'you can carefully polish it ...'

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kah22

Fondant or royal icing for Christmas cake?

Queen OfPuds thanks very much for your reply and the cornflour tip.

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Welshcookie

Fondant icing

Yes, it has its good points, but it doesn't taste very nice.

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Queen of Puds

Fondant tip ...

You dust it off afterwards ...!?!

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Queen of Puds

Ah - I see ...

Aha, now I get it!! You mean the FONDANT doesn't taste very nice!

Kids seem to really like fondant, but I know what you mean. I tend to peel the icing off anyway, but it is great for decorating novelty cakes.

 
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