How to reduce fatty taste

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Sharononline

How to reduce fatty taste

When I go abroad to places like Cyprus - they have lovely lamb dishes, made with cheaper cuts of meat but they are not fatty at all, nor is there any sign of the fat. when I cook these things I end up with the whole dish being really greasy. I know that you need to cook these cuts slowly but how do they get rid of the fat. Do they somehow cook the fat out and then proceed with the recipes with altered timings?
Any help appreciated.

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Lindsey, Food Editor

Lamb fat

Hello Sharon,

Whenever I make any type of lamb ragout casserole at home I always leave it to cool first then chill it in the refrigerator and spoon of all the fat that sets hard on the surface.

Best wishes

Lindsey

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sam from worthing

lamb fat and greek dishes.


when making this type of dish (greeky)like stifado - i never use any other oil - other than the actual lamb fat that comes out after browning. Like Lindsey, best cooked the day before eating, so you can skim off any fat that has surfaced - looks horrid, but tastes sublime.

If planning on cooking and eating the same day - hold an ice cube over the very top of your dish - fat is attracted to the cold, then lift up slowly the ice cube and shake it off, and repeat.

also cut off any excess fat from the joint that you are going to cook - even a whole leg of lamb, a shank etc. and once any lmab has been browned if your recipe calls for it - even lean minced lamb - drain it off - into a paper towel or old butter tub - not down the plug hole - and through in the bin, (or save in a bowl for roast potatoes, yummmm)

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sam from worthing

fatty after taste


also, if making a greeky dish - a squirt of lemon juice into the dish will do no harm at all to lift the fatty after taste.

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Tompeters

Lamb fat

There is also a temperature effect, I think. If you slow-cook lamb chops (those with plenty of fat) in a pan so they come out grey and anaemic-looking taste like old sock. If you sear them well as you would a steak and keep the temperature up the flavour is entirely different and delicious.

Could it be just the Maillard reaction http://tinyurl.com/kl5nmm7 or is something else also at play?

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Welshcookie

Lamb fat

I think you will find that the Mediterranean lambs are much leaner than the lambs we produce in this country.

Some farmers in the UK produce specifically for that market. Mainly the small, lean lambs. A lot used to go to Italy.

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Queen of Puds

Lamb

I skim the fat off too - doing slow roast shoulder of lamb tomorrow & will drain any liquid off at intervals into a cold ceramic dish so it cools quicker, then skim it & only use the meat juices in the finished gravy. I have always thrown the fat away - never thought of doing spuds in it - might try that tomorrow!

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Tompeters

Lamb fat

If you're going to try doing the pots in lamb fat, do some and some...I don't like them in lamb fat. "1 goose fat, "2 beef dripping, for my taste.

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Queen of Puds

Lamb fat

I'll do some of each then - but some lamb, some rapeseed oil cos haven't any beef dripping or goose fat in ....

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Welshcookie

Roasties

I save the fat and jelly from every roast I do. Pour it into a ramekin, mark it with the appropriate letter and put it in the freezer. Then I use the fat for basting and roasties and use the jelly for the gravy.

 
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