Sugar Thermometer

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Nicole Mason

Sugar Thermometer

Hello

I live at altitude where water boils at only 80 degrees celsius. I checked this with my sugar thermometer before I made fudge. If water boils at only 80, then what temperature is the soft ball stage for sugar? Do I still wait until it is 115 degrees c or do I adjust it down by 20 degrees too? Does altitude have an effect on the temperature of sugar or only on the boiling point for water? The temperature is constant, only the boiling point is different. The question is: Is the softball stage of sugar dependent on the fact the sugar is boiling or on the temperature itself?

Regards
Nicole

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Tompeters

Boiling point

Where do yo live? 80C is at almost 6000m!

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SonyaK

Altitude

Everest South Base Camp in Nepal is at an altitude of 5,364 metres!!!!

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Nicole Mason

Johannesburg

I live in Johannesburg, South Africa. 1753m above sea level (5751ft)

I don't think my sugar thermometer is the most accurate device on the planet, but if it reads 80deg for boiling water, then how do I adjust for sugar?

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Welshcookie

Adjusting temperature

I just Googled ' adjusting temperature for altitude and this came up straight away.

'However, if you do not have time to test your thermometer in boiling water, or if you just want a general idea of how to adjust candy temperature recipes, here is a handy rule of thumb:

Subtract two degrees Fahrenheit from a stated temperature for every 1000 feet you are above sea level.

For instance, if you live at 2000 feet above sea level, your approximate conversion would be four degrees less than the stated candy temperature. So if you were making a recipe that called for the candy to be brought to 240 F, you would only boil it to 236 F.

Another example: if you live at 6500 feet above sea level, your conversion factor would be 13 degrees less. (2 x 6 (thousand feet) + 1 degree for that extra 500 feet.) If your recipe called for 280 F, you would only cook your candy to 267 F. As you can see, the higher the altitude, the more important it is to do this conversion. Even a few degrees can make a huge difference in the successful outcome of the candy.'

I know every thinks it is dismissive to say - Google it! - but it is useful.

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Tompeters

Temperature altidude

Not at all sure about extrapolating that simple linear rule of thumb to 6000' or so. Degrees F and degrees C are not linear, in any case. I don't know the physics of the problem....is it the temperature per se that creates the caramelisation, or is it the moisture content?

I think I'd ask a local enthusiast...in the UK, someone who makes and sells jam at local country markets, for example.

 
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