New Food Mixer

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Lilablu

New Food Mixer

Just got my first proper food mixer and I want to try it out but would like to know if there are any pit falls to avoid while using it.

I want to make my own bread which I have done a couple of times by hand but despite doing everything the same (or at least I thought i did) my two loaves have turned out totally different. My first one was light with a crispy crust and a delight to eat while the other didn't rise properly despite being left for much longer than the hour required and could have been used for a door stop! What am I doing wrong and will it be better in my new mixter?

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Honey

New Food Mixer

How are you getting on with your new mixer?

Sometimes it's no fault of yours that you're producing bricks. It can be the fault of the flour. Apparently last years harvest produce flours low in gluten and we have had a few interesting loaves. It can also be effected if your yeast is old. I always keep mine in the fridge.

Hope you're enjoying your new machine.

H x

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Janice

Bread

Both those factors Honey mentions are important and can determine your results, as too can the weather. I didn't realise just how much until recently when my beautiful rise-through-the-roof loaves suddenly barely rose above the tins. I did nothing different, but the weather had changed from dry to very humid and now depending on the day I make bread, which is almost every other day, my loaves will change accordingly. Even on "bad bread days" they are still delicious, just not as risen and light as I would like. I don't know if you are located in a place where you have great changes of weather so that may not be the cause, but it is for me and worth considering. Like Honey, I keep my yeast in the fridge. Good luck with it and don't give up, bread has a mind of its own!

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Tompeters

New Food Mixer

I, too, have had my woes. As for flour moisture, bag and clip-seal flour as soon as you buy it then the moisture content won't change with the weather. Also helps stop mites other than those already in there when you bought it :0

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Lilablu

Food Mixer - Thanks for Advice

Thanks for all your responses you have given me plenty to think about. Did my first bread with it on Saturday and it turned out great, just hope I can keep it up.

Made a lemon drizzle sponge and that wasn't as good as when I use a hand mixer and I did try not to overbeat it but I think that I must have done all the same.

Looking forward to the end of the week when I can start again because I really enjoyed myself on Saturday.

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sam from worthing

new food mixer


what brand/model of mixer did you buy?

i have a moulinex that i have no end of trouble with mixing flour for bread and cake with.

so i end up using hands, spoon or hand held mixer.

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sam from worthing

new mixer....



also, humidity can play a part in bread making, with the rise process.

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Katrina B

Bread Making Woes

Hello. I make my own bread but have arthritis in my hands and have been looking into buying a food mixer. I used to have a Kenwood many years ago but don't want a huge one like that. Has anyone tried the new Kenwood Prospero? The bread is only for me as my husband likes the wholegrain sort and I can't tolerate wholegrains. I make my own white bread from organic (Dove) flour. I have also used Wrights flour (which gives a spongy texture) and Allisons which tends to be more "solid".

As an aside, I learned from a friend in the Scottish Highlands that height above sea level can also play its part. Apparently you can't make good Yorkshire puddings above 500 feet! They turn out like biscuits!! I wonder if that is the same with bread rising!

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Tompeters

Prospero

I bought a Prospero a year ago and the quality is deplorable. The processor attachment broke on the fourth use and it's all cheap.

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Tompeters

Bread

For bread, a bredmaker is brilliant. Hmmmmm......sounds like a Pippa-tip :)

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Honey

New Food Mixer

I've had a Kenwood Chef since 1971 and it's still going strong... though I doubt they make them like that now.

I honestly think you can't beat a Panasonic bread maker for making bread... particularly if as you say you have arthritic hands. When we bought ours we got a really good deal off E-bay. We make about three loaves a week... sometimes more... and we make both white and wholemeal loaves. We use Waitrose malted bread flour (very like a Granary loaf) and for the white bread we use Waitrose Leckford Estate bread flour and both are really good.

H x

 
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