Does brandy retard yeast?

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Rachs

Does brandy retard yeast?

Twice I made some hot cross buns and soaked the sultanas in brandy and water first (brandy not in original recipe). For some reason the buns didn't rise. I used fresh yeast the second time I made the buns, but same result.

Could anyone tell me if brandy might effect the yeast and stop it proving and this is why my dough didn't rise?

Thanks!

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Queen of Puds

Alcohol in bread dough

Have you had success with the recipe without the brandy? I assume that everything else is in order - ingredients in date etc?

I believe that alcohol inhibits the creation of gluten, which holds the rise, so if there is a lot which leaks from the fruit, this could be the problem. On the other hand, the fundamental point of the yeast is that it reacts with the sugar to make alcohol & create bubbles of C02 to make it rise, so I could be wrong.

On balance, I might be tempted to make them normally & just drink the brandy?

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Rachs

Thanks

lol! That sounds like a brilliant idea "drink the brandy". Hmmm ... you're right, I guess I need to try the recipe without my additions and see if it makes a difference.

Thank you for your answer, and the laugh!

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Tompeters

Does brandy retard yeast?

"On balance, I might be tempted to make them normally & just drink the brandy?"

LOL :)) I bought some Morrisons premium HCB the other day and they were really nice.

Baker's yeast is tolerant to alcohol to about 3%. That's 3% C2H5OH by mass. Brandy is about 40% C2H5OH. To retard the yeast you would need far more brandy than you could wish as a flavouring. I tablespoon should be enough for flavour.

Brewer's and winemaking yeast is available that's tolerant to up to 15% alcohol. But it doesn't work well in baking.

I've given up on HCB. I've tried, not mastered them and commercial ones are good enough for me, so I have moved on.

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Welshcookie

Yeast

It is the dried fruit that retards the action of the yeast.

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Tompeters

Fruit retards yeast


"It is the dried fruit that retards the action of the yeast.

"



WC -- That figures. I am always heavy-handed on the fruit.

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Queen of Puds

Hot cross buns

I've tried too & always been unimpressed with the results. They have always been eaten with gusto, but never quite came up to my required standard & seemed to go dry really quickly - I like them very squidgy & soft the day they are baked & still be soft & fluffy the day after - my Mum said that she used to have a kind of a batter style HCB recipe that worked well - but she lost it at some point & couldn't be sure what the proportions were.

On a connected note, did anyone try the M&S chocolate HCB this year - with Belgian choc drops in & a kind of choc bread? Now they were my idea of Heaven.

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Rachs

Cheers tompeters

Thanks so much for your very imformative response. I think I might have another go and leave out the brandy (or drink it as Queenofpuds suggested!).

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Rachs

@ Welshcookie

Thanks for your response. Can you explain why the fruit retards the yeast please? I'd be really interested.

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Welshcookie

Dried fruit

It was something I was not aware of until recently, but my informant was a true bakery expert, an instructor who had, in effect, been brought up in a flour sack!

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Tompeters

Does brandy retard yeast?


" It was something I was not aware of until recently, but my informant was a true bakery expert, an instructor who had, in effect, been brought up in a flour sack! "

WC -- That is confirmed from another site. If you want the original google in quotes but essentially:

"
KNEAD IN DRIED FRUITS, NUTS, AND SEEDS
Sometimes dried fruits, nuts, and seeds are kneaded into the degassed dough or after its first short rest. If added during the mixing stage, the sugar in dried fruit inhibits yeast fermentation by binding up water for their growth. Nuts and seeds act like tiny scissors in the dough, and effectively hamper the gluten networking forming mixing, kneading and fermentation steps.

After degassing the dough after its primary fermentation, stretch the dough delicately with your fingertips, into a thick square - do not press down on the dough while doing so. Sprinkle a large pinch of dried fruits or nuts all over the top surface and then fold the dough in half and knead to incorporate for about 2 minutes. Don't get discouraged as it takes a little more time to mix in. Repeat a couple of times - don't overdo it!

xxxxx SAYS: if using dried fruit in a yeast bread recipe, soak it first. If not done, it will absorb a lot of water from the bread's ingredients, which results in a drier loaf.

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Welshcookie

Dried fruit

Thank you for that.

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Rachs

@ Tompeters

Ahhh! Excellent explanation, thanks very much!

 
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