How slow and long can you cook meat?

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Tompeters

How slow and long can you cook meat?

Years ago I found myself on a package holiday with a couple, he was a chef in a carvery. In those days (1980s) carvery meat fell off the bone, looked pink but was clearly well-done albeit moist and generally totally flavourless. He said that they put it into a hot oven for a short blast then drop the temperature down to some very low level - 65C? Not sure if it was that low, but it was very low. They used to put several large ribs of beef into the oven and what wasn't served would be held at that temperature until the next service, sometimes next day.

I usually try to cook lamb slow but even so, around 35 min per lb at a low oven, removing when internal temp is 60-62C, so not so slow.

For perfection, what's the best oven temp and timing for a leg of lamb? Time is no object...just perfection.

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Biggles !

lamb, all depends.....

"For perfection, what's the best oven temp and timing for a leg of lamb? Time is no object...just perfection. "


Ha ha, I rely on hubby for cooking the perfect leg of lamb. Always goes into a very hot oven for a few mins, then reduce heat to 180 C; the rest is down to look and smell I believe, for him. For me, I cook at a lower temperature and for longer. Perhaps that is why hubby now cooks the lamb. I cook beef and pork.

Actually (according to my sheperdess friend who farms lambykins for a living), it will depend upon the age of your lamb and what it has been fed on. I took delivery of 4 lamb shoulders today and the sheperdess who delivered them, told me the lambs were a bit older than usual so would need longer cooking; no problem for us. I would have had more but I was given (I paid for it of course) half a lamb on Thursday and am trying to keep some room in my freezers for a HUGE batch of Halloumi cheese which should be arriving in the next 11 days. Happy days xx

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Tompeters

How slow and long can you cook meat?

Biggles -- That's interesting. The best lamb I have ever roasted was in the days we had an Aga. Hot oven for fifteen then to the medium oven. I really don't get on with our Rangemaster...fierce electric fan oven. I used to do better with the non-thermostatic LPG oven. When I talk to Rangemaster they suggest that I am being reactionary or conservative...but I happily embrace new cooking techniques like combo mics. One of the 'problems' with the Rangemaster is lack of airflow...open the door and my specs mist up. That isn't 'roasting', it's more like 'pot roasting'.

Gosh, it's Easter and clocks forward. Happy Easter, Biggles and all :))

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JAMES

Lamb

I don't even consider lamb to be edible. Bleurgh.

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Queen of Puds

slow roasting

I tried to follow James Martin's recipe for beef fillet which roasted in clingfilm at 60 degrees, but my oven didn't go that I so it wasn't ideal for a normal domestic oven perhaps.

I have roasted shoulder or leg of lamb & pork for over 6 hours but you do need to put some liquid in periodically so it doesn't dry out, & I tend to use a casserole pot with a lid for most of the time if I cook it that way. But with my sous vide, you can cook meat for up to several days, dep on the cut. It does make it really tender but I think you only really get excellent flavour from the best quality ....

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Tompeters

How slow and long can you cook meat?

QOP -- Is that more of a pot-roast? Can you tell me more about your sous vide? I vac-pak on a daily basis (ribbed bag, not the professional type). I am short of counter space but maybe that's something I can find a spot for as I am trying to cut down our food bill by buying slower-cooking cuts.

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Queen of Puds

slow roasting

I suppose it is a sort of pot roast when I put the lid on Tomp, yes. I tend to chuck a half bottle of wine and/or stock & veg, to make a nice sauce or gravy....

The sous vide is about the size of a breadmaker, & cones into its own for eg shoulder, lamb shanks, ox cheek, lamb neck fillet, any steak (because you can get it edge to edge rare & very tender). I have also done brisket or topside which becomes meltingly soft, ideal as a meal like that or pulled apart & put in a pie. There are very few recipes in the book it came with - mine was an Xmas pressie from Lakeland. Expensive but brilliant so far ....

There are a couple of decent web sites/blogs that have handy tips. The books on sous vide are a bit lacking though I feel, but I do get email newsletters from the manufacturer - but basically it is a good way of doing meat when you don't want it in a hurry! I have been compiling a sous vide list of temperatures v time & results for future reference. Perhaps I need to write a book about it!

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Tompeters

Sous vide

QOP -- for an overview, how does it work? You vac some raw meat in marinade, freeze or chill, then cook in the machine?

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Queen of Puds

Slow cooking & the sous vide

Hi Tomps,

With the sous vide, you're right, you seal the raw meat in a vac bag - generally with a dry rub or chilled butter seasoning & then plunge into the water bath once it has come up to temperature. It is difficult to do it with a liquid marinade. I would do that from room temp, not chilled or frozen. For tender cuts, you leave it at about 56.5 degrees for up to 4 hrs, for tougher cuts where you want to break down the sinews & gristle etc, then you cook at 75 to 85 degrees for up to 72 hours - I have my 'table' of results now to help! It is more science than cooking because you can't fiddle or adjust the seasoning during the cooking, so think Heston B....

When you take it out of the bath, you have the meat secured in it's own liquor, which you can use for gravy or freeze/save for later. You usually want to brown off any steaks in a searingly hot pan for a couple of mins, but bear in mind all the meat comes out not browned, so it depends on the recipe if this matters. It is obviously how they get uniform steaks in some places though.

I have been hugley pleased with steaks & slow cooked meat, disappointed with fish (turbot tasted 'uncooked' to me because of the texture - cod might be better) and thought the 'poached eggs' in their shells were an abomination (set yolk & raw white - why???)

But if you are going to buy, I'd do a bit of research, definitely read the blog called 'Me&mytorch - Adventures in sous vide & blow torch cookery' - but if you did buy one, I could email you the links I found useful and type up my results table so far for you. Work in progress this end - but let me know!!

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Tompeters

How slow and long can you cook meat?

QOP -- That is really interesting. Are you able to upload your times etc. to the space on DOL, or maybe you have some cloud space? I would seriously like to try this...so the first decision is 'which machine'.

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Queen of Puds

How slow and long can you cook meat?

I presume I can upload as if it was a recipe?? I'll give it a go - won't be today though - got to go see in-laws.

The machine I have is the sous vide supreme - was about £250 - £300 I think. They have a website - sousvide.com. There was one blog where a bloke made his own machine. Don't think I'd have managed that & I'd have been terrified if OH had tried to make one. (I lived through his attempt at making a solar panel.)

The vacuum sealer came separately, but it sounds like you have that sorted already.

I'll get on to posting my list asap & add back on here when I have.

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Tompeters

How slow and long can you cook meat?

QOP -- I'd really appreciate that, thank you. Thomasina was on about getting a slow cooker six months ago but I've got niggley doubts about the safety...at these low temperatures you can easily stray into bacteria growth territory and some of the bugs - even though they might be killed by a quick heating at the end - produce toxins. Botulin is one of those and I have an idea that E. coli 0157 is another. Both of those spook me.

No panic - I am destroying the garden with a 1.5 tonne excavator and I don't think that Thomasina is going to allow me into the house, let alone the kitchen until I have sorted it :) Sounds as though your OH and I would get along famously!

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Queen of Puds

FAO Tomps: Sous vide

I have now added my 'results' to my profile - once you've finished with your excavator you can have a read. It doesn't fit in cleanly as a recipe, but at least it's there.

I still feel like a novice with sous even though I have used it frequently since I unpacked it. I want to have a go at cooking something in liquid next. The suggestions are that you freeze any liquid first - even when adding olive oil.

But what I could really do with is a Delia masterclass on sous vide ...!

 
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