flattening cakes

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Artylady

flattening cakes

I always follow recipes, tin sizes etc impicitly, but my cakes and sponges always seem to rise beautifully during baking but sink in the first few minutes while cooling. They are cooked through,as tested with a skewer or by springing back when touched (and when eten!)so it isn't that. Can it be something to do with now having an electric fan oven? I'm not sure but I think this may have started when I got my new oven, which is a fan whereas my old one was an ordinary gas one.

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Honey

Flattening cakes

At the back of my mind, I have a feeling that I've heard it said that this can be due to your cake tins not being deep enough. I know that Delia always advocates deep tins. Just a thought.

H x

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Honey

Flattening Cakes

If you click on Cookery School at the top of this page and then The Tyranny of Tins... Delia explains that tins should be 4 cm deep if you're talking about Victoria Sponge Cakes.

http://www.deliaonline.com/deliaonline-cookery-school/deliaonline-cookery-school-equipment-the-tyranny-of-tins.html

H x

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Artylady

The tyranny of depths!

Thanks for such quick replies! it isn't the tin depths, sadly - happens with tins the right depth too. I'm wondering if it's got something to do with the non-stick surface on the tins.

I seem to recall reading somewhere that some surfaces don't provide enough 'grip' for the cake mixture to cling as it rises??

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Thistledo

Flattening cakes

If your cake tins are lined, then you wouldn't have the problem of the mixture sticking to the sides.

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Welshcookie

Non-stick tins

I know they are sold for baking, but non-stick pans are not recommended for cakes or pastry. I presume they were manufactured because of demand, but that does not make them correct.

I am thinking especially of black-coated tins.

I suspect they don't conduct heat as well as thin metal.

 
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