Large cakes

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ElizaD

Large cakes

Does anyone know why when I make a large cake such as a Madera, it doesn't rise at the edges. I get a flat area then it rises ok to the middle.

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Nenna

large cakes

When you put a cake into a hot oven the sides set first while the centre carries on rising. If you think about it, the sides are nearest the heated sides of the tin so they will be baked first. To get around this you can wrap strips around your baking tins, Lakeland sell one version and there is another type made of silicone. These protect the sides of the mixture from heating up too quickly so that the centre doesn't rise too much above the sides.

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Thistledo

Large cakes

Don't most sponge-type cakes rise in the middle? Don't think I've ever made one that doesn't.

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Welshcookie

Large cakes

Why buy silicone strips when you can use brown paper? Or I suppose place your tin inside a larger tin to protect the mixture.

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Nenna

being helpful

I was just making a suggestion, these products are available for this very purpose, are easy to use and once bought last fpr ever.

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ElizaD

large cakes

Thanks, I understand what you have explained to me, and shall experiment to see which works best. Thanks again.

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Welshcookie

Large cakes

I did not mean to be dismissive, but I have fallen for the blandishments of Lakeland products so many times, I often look for the cheap alternative now.

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ChocTruffle

Large Cakes

Have you tried slightly hollowing out the centre of your cake before placing it in the oven? As the cake cooks the centre should rise to the same (or similar) height as the edges.

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ElizaD

large cakes

Yes I know about hollowing out the centre of the cake. I am pretty certain that it is a temperature issue though - edges cooking quicker than the centre. Lakeland is a fantastic shop I am called Mrs Lakeland by some of my friends! But a agree they are very expensive

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Nenna

large cakes

I also agree that some of the products in Lakeland seem over expensive and not always necessary but some do work and I have a cupboard full of their stuff that has proved useful.However, if you want to experiment with out buying these strips do what I did before going to the expense of buying them. An article in an American book showed how to do this...... take a long strip of baking foil , long enough to go around your tin and a bit over, and three times its' depth, then get some kitchen/paper towels the same dimensions and soak them in cold water. Wrap the foil around the wet paper towels and place around your baking tin. Use paper clips to fasten the ends together and then go ahead with baking your cake in the tin. A bit of a palaver I know, but it works in the same way, and I know I would rather have used this method than spending hard earned money on the strips when I was bringing up my family. Now I am older but not necessarily wiser!

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Gerry

rising sponge cakes

I'm no great cake-maker but mine rise pretty evenly. Don't know why; but I've never thought about it before reading your post.

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Nenna

large cakes

To be honest, I don't mind the doming of some cakes, such as loaf cakes, madeira cakes and some fruit cakes, I think it adds to their home-made attraction. But sometimes it is nice to have a flat surface if you want to frost it or layer it. I made a Ginger cake a couple of days ago and I forgot to use my silicone strips,(dozy me!) and the top rose and then split, not what I wanted, I could have avoided it if I had used my strips.

 
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