hot water crust pastry

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yammer

hot water crust pastry

I'm making some raised game pies and have succeeded in making them without a problem, but as soon as I remove them from the tins to put back in the oven for the final browning, the juices from the meat pour out of the bottom and I lose maybe half a mug of juice from an 8 inch pie. I have made 4 now and the same thing happens every time. I have another 4 to make does anyone have any suggestions as to what I'm doing wrong?

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John S.

Leaky Pies

I know exactly what you mean, been there done it, got the Tee shirt! very discouraging isn't?
First of all, if you are making proper raised pies you don't use a tin.
The most important thing is when making them as a raised pie or in a tin is not to have any cracks or joins in your pastry case otherwise it is going to happen 95% of the time.
If making them in tins (loose bottom of course), roll the pastry out large enough that you can put it in the tin in one piece and adjust the side wall thickness by pressing the pastry against the tin with your fingers to mold it to your desired thickness, fill it, put on and seal the lid in place, (don't forget to put a half inch hole in the middle of the lid, see note at end) and bake for the stated amount of time, remove the outside of the baking tin by putting the pie on a tall tin of something out of the pantry that the outer tin will fit loosely over then slide the outer tin down off the pie then return the pie to the oven for finish browning.

To make a raised pie I have found that it is easiest to form the meat on a parchment paper covered plate into a large round slab , (I use a large tin can with the top and bottom removed for this process), put the plate with the meat on it in the freezer for about an hour or until the outside of the meat has a sturdy frozen crust on it. Roll out the pastry large enough to cover the bottom and sides and a little extra for attaching the lid, working quickly, sit your semi frozen meat in the middle of the pastry then raise the crust up around the meat,working the pastry with your hands to adjust the side wall thickness, fit lid and bake on a baking sheet with sides to prevent drips of fat from the pastry dropping on the oven bottom.

Note. It is worthwhile making a tube about two to three inches long out of foil to fit in the vent hole in the pie lid, this serves to accomodate the expasion of the hot juices in the pie filling, the tube stops the juices from spilling out onto the lid and spoiling the appearance of the pie, the juices run back into the pie as it cools.

Hope that is of some assistance to you, Good Luck with your pies!

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yammer

yammer

Wow thanks for the reply thats really helpful. Will try your suggestions. Watch this space!

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John S.

hot water crust pastry

Yammer, I would like to add that when making the raised pie(s), it is advantageous to wrap a double or triple thickness of grease proof or parchment around your pie, secured with a couple of lengths of butcher cord or string, don't use anything nylon for obvious reasons, this wrap will give the walls of your pie support until the pastry sets, it is the first few minutes that the pie is in the oven that it is most vunerable to a side wall burst. remove the paper at the same time you would remove a tin if you were using one.
I like to give the pie a brush with beaten egg prior to the final browning phase, it gives the crust a wonderful shine.

 
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