Runny Fruit Pie Filling

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Runny Fruit Pie Filling

I have just made a Strawberry Pie, and whilst the pastry and filling were delicious, the actual filling was very runny.

In the recipe it called for 2 table spoons of corn starch(corn flour), which I added to the 500g of fresh strawberries.... but still very runny.

Would adding more con flour thicken the filling without affecting tastes... or is there another way?

Cheers...

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Welshcookie

Fruit filling

Strawberries do produce a lot of juice. Arrowroot is often used to thicken fruit juices, because it is tasteless when cooked.

If I were cooking strawberries in a pie I think I would cook them with a fruit that produced less juice.

The pie will be good nonetheless.

Actually, I would avoid strawberries at this time of year, however wonderful and tempting they looked. They lack flavour.

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Runny Fruit Pie Filling

Hi...

Thanks for the reply...

The Strawberries were not my choice... but a request from the wife... something she had as a child.

There was no apparent problem with the flavour... but having never made one before I had nothing to compare it to.

Any ideas how much arrowroot I should use?

Cheers...

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Welshcookie

Arrowroot

I just Googled and cornflour and arrowroot seem to be the same quantities.

Not sure how you would use either, though, once the pie is made.

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Runny Fruit Pie Filling

Sorry... perhaps I've not been very clear... I am thinking about future fruit pies...

cheers...

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Welshcookie

Runny pie filling

On reflection I may have muddled you by not saying thickening is for cold desserts.

Trouble with strawberries in hot pie with a pastry crust is they would collapse to a thin layer. They aren't really suitable.

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violet eyes

runny fruit pie filling

I've never made a strawberry pie but have made other fruit pies.
If I think the juice from the fruit will cause a problem I do a mix of cornflour and castor sugar and toss the fruit in that before putting in the pie. As the pie cooks it thickens any juice .
I don't know if this would work with strawberries as they are very juicy but maybe you could cook the strawberries a bit, in a pan till some of the juice runs out and strain the fruit then add it to a mix of cornflour and a little bit of sugar depending on how sweet you like the filling. It might work.

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Honey

Fruit Pie Filling

Normally arrowroot is used to thicken the juices from the fruit because not only does it not detract from the flavour of the fruit, but it also makes a clear thick... don't know what to call it... sauce/gel? But because Strawberries don't really produce juice (when cooked they tend to go to mush), then it's more difficult. But I think I would make a sauce/gel with water, sugar and the arrowroot... a bit like that Quick Gel packet stuff you can buy. You could even add a drop of red food colouring if you wanted it strawberry coloured. You cook the water, sugar and arrowroot over a medium heat until it bubbles and thickens (not too thick though because it will 'set' when it cools), then mix in your strawberries and allow it to cool just a little before you transfer this to your pie.

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runny fruit pie filling

Well last night I tried my hand at a blueberry pie...

I took the advice and cooked the blueberries for a short while then let them drain before making the pie... and I'm glad to say the pie was a great success... just the right consistency and now I have a small cup full of concentrated blueberry juice which I think will find its way on to some fresh pancakes...

now to try the same method on strawberries!

Many thanks for all the replies...

cheers...

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John S.

Fruit pie

You can also use instant tapioca, dont try to eat them straight from the oven, let them cool to allow the juices to set, if you want it warm you can always put it in the oven to reheat it.
By removing the blueberry juice you robbed the pie of flavour and volume.

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Fruit pie

can you buy instant tapioca in the uk?

my lot are to greedy to wait for a pie to cool... but I'm going to try a cherry lattice next so will try and let this one cool to see if I've got the filing right...

thanks for the reply

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Fiona C

Fruit pie

I expect you can buy instant tapioca but the point of using tapioca pearls (place in the pastry case before adding the fruit filling) is that they absorb the fruit juices and stop the pie becoming too soggy with watery juice. If you want to use a bse filling why not try a thin layer of sponge or frangipane ?

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Thistledo

Tapioca

I did read it right, didn't I?

TAPIOCA?

The last time I had that 'stuff' was in the early 50s at school, made with water. That and sago.
Yukky yuk. We used to call both frog spawn and the other word was s**k!
Tee hee.

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Gerry

yuck tapioca


"I did read it right, didn't I?
TAPIOCA?
The last time I had that 'stuff' was in the early 50s at school, made with water. That and sago.
Yukky yuk. We used to call both frog spawn and the other word was s**k!
Tee hee."


It's mega-yuck as a pud but nice as a (small) proportion of flour-substitute in certain bread recipes.

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Thistledo

Tapioca

Gerry, I'm sure you're right, lol.

 
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